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  • Alissa Myers
    April 25, 2013 Reply

    The loving truth and consistent message is why I became a Catholic. God bless!

  • Mrs Malani Baker
    April 25, 2013 Reply

    Father,
    Thank-you for your thoughtful story.theHoly Spirit has inspired you & mayOurMothercontinuetowatchoveryou. God Bless! Aloha:)

  • Pastor Dt
    April 25, 2013 Reply

    Wise words, thank you!

  • William
    April 25, 2013 Reply

    What a beautiful explanation of our faith! I think that any American faced with questions about what it is to be Catholic and what the Church teaches/believes, should send their friends this link. His Eminence has a voice for the people.
    May God’s blessings surround him and all the good that he does!

  • steve
    April 25, 2013 Reply

    Awesome message, reasonable, and clear. Thank you!!

  • Thomas Walsh
    April 25, 2013 Reply

    I really appreciate this article it makes one do a lot of soul searching. Thanks Cardinal Dolan for this wonderful insight we here in Wisconsin do miss you

  • Janet Edwards
    April 25, 2013 Reply

    Dear Cardinal Dolan,
    I pray for the day when your eyes will be open to the ignorance you display and the harm you cause in this attempt to explain that you love the sinner but condemn the sin.
    Some day you will see that lesbian and gay couples who are married (committed to love one another forever and building beautiful families and lives together) are the furthest this from “anything goes.” And you will see the horrendous harm you cause by spurious comparisons of covenantal love between two men or two women to washing hands before a meal, alcoholism, unscrupulous business people and sex outside marriage. Please have the grace to get to know well a faithful Catholic lesbian or gay couple who, I am sure, have studied the Bible as deeply as you have. Find out how they are obeying Jesus. Then work with them to bring your Church around to following Jesus too.
    Your in Christ, Janet Edwards

    • Byron
      April 26, 2013 Reply

      Can you be a faithful Catholic and go against Jesus teachings?

      • Byron
        April 26, 2013 Reply

        Would you join an NBA team and tell them they must change their rules to suit you?

      • Will
        May 1, 2013 Reply

        Byron – there is NOT one word in the Bible – not one quote that Jesus said about homosexuality , or about gay marriage – NOT ONE… anywhere… St. Paul brings it up but Jesus? NO… sorry buddy…

    • Mary M.
      April 26, 2013 Reply

      God has revealed that homosexual acts are gravely sinful. What God has revealed cannot be changed. God does not evolve. The Church welcomes everyone. We are a church of saints and sinners. People are imperfect and the Church meets people “where they are at” because that is what Jesus did. If they want to become “full members” of the Church and participate in the Sacraments, change may be necessary. Jesus calls us to conversion, not “just” to relationship with Him. “Repent and be baptized” John the Baptist preached before Jesus began his earthly ministry. Jesus is always willing to forgives but a response from us is necessary to “go and sin no more” as Jesus clearly told us. The Catholic Church was established by Christ more than 2,000 years ago. All other churches are offshoots and today there are over 35,000 different Christian denominations all claiming to have the truth ;yet they are inconsistent in their beliefs. So who has the truth? The Catholic Church does. Google the early church fathers and you will read about the early Christian church which was the Catholic Church that began with the apostles. The same Christian church exists today; that church is the Catholic Church who lives in the truth handed down through the centuries by God. We have a choice to make. Do we want to live in the truth or in some morphed version of Christianity?

    • Dave
      April 27, 2013 Reply

      Janet,

      What you have done here is made a moral theology based on what you think is right. You simply make assertions that lesbian and gay “marriage” is just fine. The Catholic Church bases its moral Theology on Sacred Scripture and Sacred Tradition (What Jesus taught). The Church also has the legitimate authority to teach definitively on these issues. On the other hand, what authority do you or I have to simply make up our own morality? That’s really all you are doing. If you are a Christian, you would need to: 1. show support for your position in Scripture (not cherry picking verses). 2.Then You would need to show this teaching was accepted or at least not contradicted by the earliest Christians, The Church Fathers. 3.Then by using reason, you would need to reconcile your moral views with all available data. I have yet to see a convincing “Christian” case made in this fashion for the moral acceptability of homosexual acts.

    • Gary Lockhart
      April 27, 2013 Reply

      “Please have the grace to get to know well a faithful Catholic lesbian or gay couple who, I am sure, have studied the Bible as deeply as you have. Find out how they are obeying Jesus. ”

      You contradict yourself Miss Edwards and quite apparently have yet to study Scripture in its entirety:

      “Who changed the truth of God into a lie; and worshipped and served the creature rather than the Creator, who is blessed for ever. Amen. For this cause God delivered them up to shameful affections. For their women have changed the natural use into that use which is against nature. And, in like manner, the men also, leaving the natural use of the women, have burned in their lusts one towards another, men with men working that which is filthy, and receiving in themselves the recompense which was due to their error.” Romans 1:25-27

      “I wrote to you in an epistle, not to keep company with fornicators. I mean not with the fornicators of this world, or with the covetous, or the extortioners, or the servers of idols; otherwise you must needs go out of this world. But now I have written to you, not to keep company, if any man that is named a brother, be a fornicator, or covetous, or a server of idols, or a railer, or a drunkard, or an extortioner: with such a one, not so much as to eat. For what have I to do to judge them that are without ? Do not you judge them that are within ? For them that are without, God will judge. Put away the evil one from among yourselves.” 1 Corinthians 5:9-13

      “Know you not that the unjust shall not possess the kingdom of God? Do not err: neither fornicators, nor idolaters, nor adulterers, Nor the effeminate, nor liers with mankind, nor thieves, nor covetous, nor drunkards, nor railers, nor extortioners, shall possess the kingdom of God.” 1 Corinthians 6:9-10
      “No, I say to you: but unless you shall do penance, you shall all likewise perish.” Luke 13:3
      That which one tolerates, one condones.

    • Chris Landreneau
      April 28, 2013 Reply

      Dear Janet Edwards,
      When you point a finger at someone & call them ignorant there are three more fingers pointing back at you. “Find out how they are obeying Jesus.” This statement you made about obeying Jesus, continuing in sinful behavior is not obeying Jesus. I will pray that God will enlighten you to His True Authentic teaching about human sexuality. Sex outside of marriage that God designed between one man & one woman is pseudo-sex. Lost in lust is not the same as lost in love.

    • Adam
      April 28, 2013 Reply

      My Dear Janet,

      There is much distress in your words. I hope you can pick up on the Fatherly and loving tone with which Cardinal Dolan wrote this peace. If you can’t, please watch some of his homilies on youtube and see how he speaks with love and sincerity. I invite you to reconsider your statement of a gay couple following and obeying Jesus. To which scripture passage are you referring? As one among many scripture passages you could read, I invite you to read Mark 10:6-9. Is this teaching compatible with a gay or lesbian lifestyle? Just consider.

    • Mary
      April 29, 2013 Reply

      Thank you Janet. My thoughts exactly. Cardinal Dolan, what you are describing is not welcoming.

    • Janixce Poss
      May 7, 2013 Reply

      Well said. Yes, we are ALL people of God and love is the core word here in all its forms. God IS all inclusive, many human clergy are not.

    • Leo Salazar
      May 8, 2013 Reply

      Well said, Janet. I find it ironic that your detractors in the comments below go so far as to scream scripture at you and demand that you hate LGBT because “God said so.” No, what Jesus told us to do is, most importantly of all, to serve God and to love one another. By refusing someone spiritual solace because of who they are is exactly the opposite of love.

  • Pamela
    April 25, 2013 Reply

    This is why many Catholics are convinced that their church has deserted them, and is out of touch with the world we live in. I can not accept what you preach. The God I know is more about love and respect.

    • Steve M
      April 26, 2013 Reply

      We will pray for you to have more humility Pamela.

    • Byron
      April 26, 2013 Reply

      So you want the Church to get more in touch with the world today?
      The world today is shallow, selfish and sex-obsessed. Our Church stands against that and that’s why I am a Catholic. BTW, the world you speak of does not inlcude the developing world which is where the majority of Catholics now live and they’re conservative.

    • Mary M.
      April 26, 2013 Reply

      Thank you Cardinal Dolan for this easy to understand format of our Catholic faith!

    • Jason Miller
      April 26, 2013 Reply

      Then the God you know is not that of the Catholic Church, so kindly look elsewhere. God bless.

      • Irene
        May 30, 2013 Reply

        That’s not what Pope Francis says. He says all are welcome and Jesus is indignant when we try to take possession of the Church, when we appoint ourselves gatekeepers, when we try to keep people out of the Church and close the doors, rather than welcoming them in the way Jesus wants us to. It was a beautiful sermon, you can find the full text at Whispers in the Loggia on May 25

    • Dave
      April 27, 2013 Reply

      “This is why many Catholics are convinced that their church has deserted them, and is out of touch with the world we live in.”

      Pamela, it’s the people who Claim to be Catholic who have abandoned the Church. Not the other way around. It’s the job of the Church to uphold what she has been given, the truth. It’s the job of all members of the body of Christ to learn, internalize and live out the teachings of Christs Church. The Church has been “out of touch” with the world since its founding by Christ Himself. That’s why He left us His *Church*. To be the “pillar and bulwark” of truth. There’s nothing in there about personal opinions about what is true. We use our intellect and reason to seek understanding of what Christ has given us in his Church.

    • Adam
      April 28, 2013 Reply

      My Dear Pamela,

      I am a Catholic who loves the Church and have never felt abandoned by it. I hope that you have the same experience of Our Mother, The Church. If you have not, I invite you to consider a bit more deeply what Cardinal Dolan is saying. As a vicar of Christ on earth, you can be sure that he loves and respects you and all of our fellow human beings. What he is trying to do is communicate through the difficult medium of a blog love and respect, along with truth and encouragement, to all who read. The God you know, is the same one I know. Let us all encourage each other to know Him more by a personal relationship with Him within the Church He founded and by the careful study of His Word. May God bless you.

  • Kimberly W.
    April 25, 2013 Reply

    Excellent article! This has been heavy on my heart lately. I’ve been trying to convey the same thing to friends who are shouting out the truth but doing so without compassion and mercy. People are being forgotten as creatures in need of God’s love when their sin goes against the written Word of God. Thank you for this post.

  • Domingo
    April 25, 2013 Reply

    Wow, that is a very beautiful message, Cardinal!
    Very well said, and I’m sure even my teens will understand what you are trying to say.
    May the True Shepherd grant you the grace to be always a holy shepherd! I am making this prayer in obedience to Our Blessed Mother’s request to pray for the shepherds.

  • Theresa
    April 25, 2013 Reply

    Thank you once again for so eloquently stated

  • Mary
    April 25, 2013 Reply

    Very beautiful and eloquent presentation of choices which can be made by anyone. I wish everyone would read and accept this and stop the condemnation and intolerance.

  • Bob Pegritz
    April 25, 2013 Reply

    Dear Eminence, This is a lovely sermonette on how we as Catholics should view others. The great Fred Rogers was a dear and personal friend. He used to say “I like you just the way you are.” I never realized until lately how difficult that was to say AND MEAN IT. After Fred died, I discovered you and your teachings. And don’t think for one moment that God had nothing to do with that. I love you, Cardinal Dolan, and I truly appreciate your work and your observations of the “herd”. Or should I say “heard?” See you on June 16th.

    Bob

  • Kim
    April 25, 2013 Reply

    Cardinal Dolan,
    Thank you for your wonderful Homily. It was exactly what I needed to hear. I was trying to find the words to say all of this and you did it for me. God Bless you Cardinal Dolan…We love you in Ohio.

  • John Tomasicchio
    April 25, 2013 Reply

    Your Emminence, how wonderfully spoken! Especially the paragraph regarding seme-sex attraction. God bless You!

  • Thomas Lichtenberger
    April 25, 2013 Reply

    What a wonderful teaching. Thank You, Cardinal Dolan!

  • James J. Suntum, SF
    April 25, 2013 Reply

    Dear Cardinal Dolan,
    All that you write sounds”simple enough” and “common sense”, but it reeally isn’t. There are several reasons why that’s so.
    First, your analogy doesn’t hold because there are no simple remedies. You can’t go to the bathroom and wash off co-habitation or abortion or homosexuality. If you make remedying those situations a pre-requisite for being “welcome’, then the people in them aren’t truly welcome and they know it and that’s why they stay away. Incidentally, your examples are just a bit disingenuous.. They leave out the condition that has driven away the most people ans has filled-up the most fundamentalist churches: the second marriage couple. And if you told the “alcoholic” or the “prominent business leader” or “wealthy people” that their situations are “mortal sins” and they can’t receive communion until their conditions are remedied, your chuches really would be empty!
    Secondly, what does “welcome” really mean? Does it mean that people in questionable situations can visit empty churches to say their private prayers, or attend Mass but not fully participate and certainly not receive communion? In those cases, people know they are not truly “welcome” and, again, that’s why they stay away.
    Thirdly, you’ve made a coupling that seems appropriate but really isn’t. You have sid that it is “Jesus – and his moral teaching – that unite us.” Certainly, Jesus is “love and truth in his very person.” But the church is not love and truth in its very essence. The Church’s “moral teaching” has the minds of two thousand years of human teachers and priests and nuns and bishops and cardinals and popes mixed up in it. The “Truth” is the person of Jesus; it is not any teaching or dogma or catechism. Only when the Church and her leaders teach and love as fully as Jesus did will that coupling be appropriate. As an example, when the Church says that people in questionable conditions of life are fully welcome to participate in liturgies as anyone else and certainly to receive communion, then she will be able to teach and to challenge and to love into growth, and then she will be telling the truth when she says “All are welcome!”

    • Jason Miller
      April 26, 2013 Reply

      1. Then the Church isn’t for you. Jesus is clear – repent and sin no more.
      2. It means they can come to Mass, but not fully participate and receive communion. That is indeed welcoming. I am invited to go to my kids soccer game – I am welcome. It doesn’t mean I can jump in and start playing – I don’t meet the criteria. Do you think that anyone that pops into Church should be able to receive communion, even if they don’t believe?!? That is absurd. There are logical and rational rules, just like in your own home. Just because kids are welcome at the dinner table doesn’t mean they can drink a beer.
      3. All those teachings of the Church come from scripture – you can find a basis for every one of them in scripture. Plus, Jesus gives the Apostles authority to bind and loose – AUTHORITY. Right out of scripture. If you read the catechism, you would know this. You reveal your ignorance on this manner.

      I think the whole tone of your comment is off putting. You think that you somehow know more than the good Cardinal, who is a compassionate Bishop AND is an accomplished student of theology, philosophy, scripture, and Church law. Please, show me your credentials. Maybe you should go lecture an accomplished physicist about his/her lack of understanding of the physical universe compared to you.

    • Suzana Malavasic
      April 28, 2013 Reply

      James, I am a convert to Catholicism, so I have the advantage over cradle Catholics to know both sides of the divide in Christianity. I also work as a Missionary in a Catholic diocese in Nigeria, and I have lived a bit in Eastern Europe. Most Catholics in the US are out of touch with the universal Church and haven’t a clear understanding of Catholic Doctrine,Culture or Church History. Therefore, I can understand why you have reacted as you have to Cardinal Dolan’s post. So much of what you say seems reactionary, as if you have personally been hurt by the challenges that the Catholic faith puts upon 1)how you interpret Jesus and 2) the way that you want to live and still call yourself a Catholic. Until you are able to humble yourself as Jesus did and seek first to do the will of the Father, as Jesus did, you will not have eyes to see, ears to hear and an open mind to understand the Truth of the Catholic Faith. May god bless and keep you.

    • Mary
      April 29, 2013 Reply

      Beautiful James. I hope the Cardinal reads it and learns from it.

  • Christine Marro
    April 25, 2013 Reply

    Thank you for this wonderful reminder of the facts of our “church”. Well stated.

  • Jessica
    April 26, 2013 Reply

    These words are both firm and gentle and they touch my heart in their explanation of the Truth. Our Church, in her intended role, is beautiful and this message captures this. Our church is love of ALL PEOPLE, not of all ACTIONS. Very well said, Your Eminence, thank you. I would like to draw from your words when I am called to defend our Church, spread her message and serve our Lord!

  • Lory Bresina
    April 26, 2013 Reply

    A clear explanation of our faith. Thank you for your continuing efforts to learn to love all without compromising the truth. Your job is to shepherd your flock and a crucial aspect of this role is to teach. Our role as Cathollic laity is to be teachable, willing to take the time to understand our mystical theology, and aim to obey the tenets of our faith. I thank God that he continues to bless and guide each and every one of us.

  • Sonja Woodman
    April 26, 2013 Reply

    Thank you for expressing so beautifully this welcome from God. I often feel that in our modern world we have a schizophrenic loss of grip on reality. Too often we are surrounded by Catholic believers who claim they know that Jesus would want things their way — without taking the trouble to read the scripture passed down from God that tell us of his way. Thank you for sharing and reminding us of the respect he deserves as he calls us to respond to his welcome.

  • Rosemary
    April 26, 2013 Reply

    Beautifully put. Thank you.

  • Msgr. Robert Dempsey
    April 26, 2013 Reply

    An excellent column that says everything just the way it needs to be said.

  • Linda
    April 26, 2013 Reply

    Thank you your Eminence for these profound words. How I needed to hear them. They quickly cut down my judgemental spirit which was always in confusion between love and truth. How do I love this person when what they are doing is against the teaching of the Catholic Church, against the Magisterium of the Catholich Church which I follow? How do react to a relative of mine who is a mother of five children, supported by welfare, who is separated from her husband and is now having a child by another man? How do I react when I think of the 5 children growing up in a situation of such immorality? I continue to pray but truly needed a concrete example of love. You have given some guidance, I love them but not what they do. I have printed this teaching and will keep it close at hand for the many situations I encounter in this troubled world so in need of God. Bless you. I will pray for you Cardinal Dolan.

  • Patricia Jenner
    April 26, 2013 Reply

    Cardinal Dolan, I thank you so much because I am dealing with things in my family and pray to God for help then I read the above. I have been a Catolic for 80 years and most of my family have left the Church. Thank you so much and please pray for me and my family.

    • Bill Blackburn
      May 7, 2013 Reply

      Patricia, please know that Jesus is everywhere and in the hearts of everyone. I fled the Church years ago but that does not mean that I fled Jesus. Your family is in fine Hands. Do not fret.

  • Mary Reynolds
    April 26, 2013 Reply

    Cardinal Dolan,
    At the same time, the Church also makes mistakes. And what has been shared as the truth, may not always be the truth as the Holy Spirit continues to move our Church into a new creation, a new way of living. We can’t do that if the pastoral leaders of the Church are not open to the Spirit moving and instead, prefer to move it themselves. And that is the truth!

  • James F. Koval, MDiv, MPA
    April 26, 2013 Reply

    Your Eminence:
    As my mentor and friend Bishop Kenneth Povish used to say, “Ya done good!” Thank you for putting this very important concept so clearly and concisely. “All are welcome” does NOT equal “anything goes.”
    Oremus pro Invicem!
    Jim
    James F. Koval, MDiv, MPA

  • Anoop
    April 26, 2013 Reply

    Good article Cardinal :)

  • Richard
    April 26, 2013 Reply

    What a wonderful and compassionate way of reminding everyone that values should not be compromised. The timing could not have been better as we all face this culture war in our nation. Today’s gospel of fear not and trust in The Lord as THE way so beautifully fit together. God bless you, Cardinal Dolan.

  • Christy
    April 26, 2013 Reply

    I so miss going to Mass but so disappointed in the Catholic Church. Continue to search for a place where I am truly welcomed. I am married to a Catholic man who is divorced so I am considered to be living in sin, and not welcome to take communion. I’ve even been told by one priest that I was not welcome in the church. If God died on the cross for us and forgives us our sins why am I not forgiven? Why should I have to divorce my husband of 30 yrs to become a full member of the church. So very very disappointed.

    • Byron
      April 26, 2013 Reply

      Of course, you’re welcome in the Church, Christy! You always will be.
      You just can’t take communion.

      As for that priest, sometimes our holy people aren’t the best communicators. They’re only human remember.

      The Church has rules, like everything else.
      Ours is based on the words of Jesus. We can’t change his words or make up words. Would you join an NBA team and demand they change the rules to suit you?

      God still loves you Christy. I advise you to go to Church. It will be good for your soul and happiness. :-)

      • Mindy M.
        May 29, 2013 Reply

        Seems to me that Jesus had no rules about who he broke bread with.

    • Jason Miller
      April 26, 2013 Reply

      I am very sorry to say, but your husband is still married to his other wife (that is unless there is grounds for an an annullment – and I highly suggest you look into that option if you haven’t already). Man CANNOT break what God has bound together – right out of scripture. This indisolubility of marriage is to protect you – so your husband can[t just walk away and leave you in poverty. That may be less of a problem in the U.S. then it was decades ago, but let me remind you that this is a world wide Church. When married women get dumped in Africa, Latin America, India, etc., it is devastating to their lives. Many are forced into prostitution. Do you think it would be worth changing God’s teaching just for your situation?!? Think of the consequence, not just for souls, but for women in third world countries. I am sorry someone told you you are not welcome in the Church. You are – but you can’t receive communion; but if you go to a non-apostolic Church (most Protestant Churches), they don’t have communion anyway. So you might as well just come and worship with us Catholic that you are so disappointed in. Remember that by the way – when you say you are disappointed in the Church, you are saying you are disappointed in us. You are not just taking a shot at the Pope and the Bishops. You are taking a shot at all of us.

    • Elijah
      April 26, 2013 Reply

      The Church teaches that marriage exists until death, so the answer to your second question is that you don’t have to divorce your husband, because you aren’t actually married to him at all – he’s married to someone else (assuming his first marriage was valid) and can only be married to one wife at a time. As to the first question, how do you expect to be forgiven for living with a married man if you won’t repent and you continue willfully with him? The fact that you began living with him thirty years ago doesn’t change what it is.

    • Terry
      April 27, 2013 Reply

      I am sorry that you are sad, but your husband cannot repeat the sacrament of marriage with a living spouse and a valid bond. Are you suggesting that the church cannot protect her sacraments? I learned this the hard way and respect the church for following the truth not just pleasing me.

    • Joseph
      April 27, 2013 Reply

      Dear Christy,
      I am sorry for your situation and fill for you. Not being able to receive the Body and Blood of Christ in communion is heart wrenching. I am a Catholic husband myself, so I wanted to share my perspective. Since you miss Mass and Holy Communion, you must be a Catholic yourself and made sincere Catholic vows of marriage. When I, as a man wishes to be a true husband as a Catholic, make my vows, I truly mean them: to love and cherish my wife for the rest of my life. The complete, or as complete as humanly possible for myself, intention for me is crucial to the Sacrament of Marriage. So it is the same for your husband. When he makes those vows to you, he must truly mean it. And if he did, then his previous marriage, he must not have meant it. If that is the case, the should seek an annulment.
      However, if he had full intention of marriage in his previous marriage and his previous wife is still alive. Then he has full obligation of complete and exclusive husbandly love to his previous wife. If that is the case, then he cannot be married to you because his vows of complete self-giving to his previous wife till death still exists. If that is the case, then you can understand that you would be living with a you devoted to but is not your husband.
      As a husband, he should be completely devoted to you and do whatever it takes to receive an annulment. If he is not your husband, then only separating from him would fulfill Christ’s call to pick up your cross and follow him.

      (Sacrament of Marriage and legality of marriage are related in many countries but are separate things.)

    • Christy
      April 29, 2013 Reply

      Christ laid his life down for us and we are still dictating our needs instead of listening to what Christ wants. Anger is the devils playground. There is a different approach you can take when wanting to be in communion and recieve the Holy Eucharist. You are welcomed in the church. You are welcomed to come to Mass and enjoy the presence of Christ in the word and knowing he comes during the consecration of the eucharist. You can also come and spend time with Him in the tabernacle and maybe even special adoration times.. You married your husband who had been married before. Biblical we are in a covenant with God. Your current husband can go through an annulment process. If he is approved, you can get your marriage blessed and you will be in full communion with the church. We are not here to judge, we are here to love and lead our brothers and sisters down a path of righteousness. People are falable but the church is not. Christ ways are not always easy but they are always right. I would like to ask for forgiveness on behalf of all who made you feel unwelcomed. Blessings

  • Maureen Dierkes
    April 26, 2013 Reply

    A beautifully and concisely written article! I am sharing with my family…one of whom is a son who is living with his girlfriend. I love them both dearly and have lovingly but firmly expressed as best I could my sadness and disappointment at their decision. It has been heart wrenching for me as a mother, but I have continued to show my love for both in my words and actions, but most of all through my prayers! God bless you Cardinal Dolan for being a loving witness for Truth and a strong faithful trustworthy shepherd who loves his flock!

  • Mariana
    April 26, 2013 Reply

    This is so good, and so pastoral, Cardinal, but could you perhaps help your friend Bishop Murphy to understand that he is not very pastoral in his response here (which made the Washington Post and makes us all look bad) and that he needs to understand that the internet is where the church will evangelize in the future? This hurts us all. http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/on-faith/catholic-bishop-returns-petitions-to-ousted-gay-man/2013/04/25/fb501d7e-adea-11e2-b240-9ef3a72c67cc_story.html

  • Robert Homan
    April 26, 2013 Reply

    Good piece :)

  • Christy Clark
    April 26, 2013 Reply

    Well said. I wish more people understood this. I read your brother’s book about your life. I enjoyed it immensely. Although I am from a small town in Minnesota, one of my close friends lived in the Milwaukee Diocese when you were there. She and her husband spoke highly of you so when I saw this book, I bought it on my Nook and found it entertaining and very inspiring. You are so talented, respected, and widely known yet so humble and happy and inspiring. I don’t know how you put up with some of the criticism you receive on Facebook. I know you strive at all times to be an apostle of Jesus and you shouldn’t be judged for anything. If we were all a lot more caring, kind, compassionate, and loving, and a lot less judgmental, this world would be so much easier to live in. Some people have a bucket list to do crazy things before they die. Mine would be to meet you some day and say Thank You in person for igniting and inspiring my Catholic faith. You’ve made a difference in my life and you don’t even know who I am. Not many people can say that . Thank you for all you do for the Catholics of the United States and of the world.

  • Danno
    April 26, 2013 Reply

    So, what part of who I am are you willing to welcome? And NOT welcome? It seems like your message falls into age-old heresies of splitting the spirit and the flesh. Jesus certainly made no such distinctions when it came to the golden rule of loving others (and what matters more than that?) As an ex-priest, I have watched from a safe distance…from an Episcopal Church and my three-legged stool which also values reason with scripture and tradition. When will Romans finally be catholic, I wonder?

    • bobster
      April 27, 2013 Reply

      oh, danno… this is not a splitting, but an ordering. spirit and body are a unity, but the spirit should be in charge of the flesh, not mastered by it.
      the golden rule of love does not extend to loving their sin. this is why Jesus said “go and sin no more”.

  • Sharon Twardowski
    April 26, 2013 Reply

    This was beautifully said! Difficult subject…..so many moral changes now accepted by many but its a difficult time for the Catholic Church and her faith family who respect moral values

  • Paul H
    April 26, 2013 Reply

    Thank you Cardinal Dolan, for posting this. I have heard this message (about welcoming people but not welcoming their sins) on Catholic blogs, on Catholic radio, in Catholic publications, etc. But it is encouraging to hear this same message from a bishop and Cardinal!

  • polycarped
    April 26, 2013 Reply

    This is a good post, thank you Your Emminence. I want to raise a quite specific issue, but one that I think fits very well with your theme and also with the story of Freddy’s visit: the question of worthy reception of the Holy Eucharist. Although it is almost impossible to say (and in-line with your post, not our job to say) whether someone is or isn’t appropriately disposed to receive Holy Communion, I think it would be fair to say that lack of confession availability and the fact that confession queues are simply nonexistent in most parishes (at least where I am), contrasted with the long queues for Holy Communion, can give us a good idea in general. I have had several conversations recently with Catholics who simply do not ‘feel’ that a person needs to be in any particular state of preparedness to receive; “But Jesus would come to anyone”. This is very problematic, is it not? The idea that receiving Our Lord unworthily seems to have become an alien concept to many Catholics (especially younger ones). In addition to being an offence against Our Lord, the concern about mass unworthy reception of the Eucharist is an issue that pains many of us so much. Can you offer any thoughts on this, in light of your post? Many thanks and God Bless you.

  • Don Bueltmann
    April 26, 2013 Reply

    God Bless you Father, stand strong in the Word of God. There are too many people trying to apply their own intelligence to interpreting God’s Holy Word.
    Love from an ex-St. Louisan

  • Kathleen Sundaram
    April 26, 2013 Reply

    Thanks Your Excellency. I plan to share this on Facebook and Twitter.

  • Cathleen Srour
    April 26, 2013 Reply

    That the analogy of requiring a child to wash his hands before a meal is an appropriate one to support the church’s position that All are Welcome with expectations is so simplistic as to suggest you are writing to a child. To say we do not judge a person, but it is aceptable to judge their actions is also reminiscent of the kind of teaching I encountered in the Church as a child. Teaching that does not expect questionning. It does not give the adult credit for being able to understand scripture as the Word of God which is clearly filled with compassion and love for
    each person without judgement…no judgement….
    Most disturbing to me is your suggestion that someone who is Gay or Lesbian must
    not express their love sexually because that expression is sinful.
    Homosexuality is not a “condition”. It is not a choice. It is just the way a person is born: male, female, gay, straight, short, tall, black, white,
    Persons who are homosexual have every right to live and love just as anyone does.
    Created in the image and likeness of God. We all need to remember that..

  • Lisa Graas (@CatholicLisa)
    April 26, 2013 Reply

    Like the commenter Alissa Myers, I am a convert who became Catholic because I found the truth (not “anything goes”) in the Catholic Church. Thank you, Cardinal Dolan.

  • Joey Campbell
    April 26, 2013 Reply

    I disagree and feel strongly that this is one major reason the Church is losing such large numbers of followers. “We can never judge a person… but, we can judge a person’s actions.” Really, what is the difference? I agree with an above comment that says it isn’t as easy as washing our hands and being welcome at the dinner table. Must we be perfect to be welcome at Church? In which case who could call themselves Catholic? Shouldn’t any effort toward a relationship with God be encouraged and nurtured rather than people feeling judged and unwelcome? Even if someone has committed/is committing what the Church believes to be mortal sin, I strongly believe God still loves them the same as he loves someone who is nearly perfect. So who are we to treat the person otherwise?
    In the example you gave, Jesus did not even judge the adulterous woman. He did not tell her “you are no longer welcome at my table due to your sin.” He is the only one whose judgement matters yet priests and parishoners alike think it is their place to insert their opinions of the actions of others. Even at the Last Supper when he gave his followers his body and blood, he did not make them come to him and confess their sins. He FREELY gave himself to them and to all of us. Let’s live as true Christians and show love and mercy to all, and let our lives be an example. Let God be the judge.

  • Dan Moriarty
    April 26, 2013 Reply

    This is actually an interesting debate. What does it mean to be a welcoming community with moral teachings at its core? How do we simultaneously welcome people, and make it clear that we, as a community, do not condone certain behavior? I think of Richard Leonard, SJ’s testimony about how controversial Church teachings prohibiting certain behavior provided an anchor for him in a very difficult time (http://www.uscatholic.org/articles/201302/what%E2%80%99s-god-got-do-it-26954).

    But the big problem here is that I think Church leaders focus far too much on “bedroom” morality, and have a serious double-standard regarding homosexuality when it comes to extending welcome in practice. I like that Cardinal Dolan mentions abusive business practices, but how often has an exploitative capitalist been prohibited from serving in parish ministries, or fired from teaching in a Catholic school? (Okay, it’s hard to be an exploitative capitalist if you’re a school teacher, but you get my point.) For that matter, when has this happened to a heterosexual Catholic cohabiting with a partner or openly buying contraceptives at the local drugstore? I fear the double-standard applied to homosexuals constitutes discrimination, and so violates the spirit of the U.S. Bishops’ wonderful letter, “Always Our Children.” Jesus did not wait to find out if the adulteress would reform her ways before telling her he did not condemn her. He did not wait for Matthew to make up for the abuses he had committed as a tax collector before inviting him to serve as an apostle. We have to move beyond hate-the-sin/love-the-sinner, and continue to grapple with these issues with generous hearts, tough minds, and Jesus as our guide.

    And with all due respect to Cardinal Dolan’s good father, and due concern for the hygienic health of little Freddie, I dare say Jesus invited tax collectors, prostitutes, and other sinners to share at his table regardless of whether they washed their hands.

  • ANNE
    April 26, 2013 Reply

    If we Love our Neighbors as commanded by Jesus, we will help them to get to Heaven for eternity.
    We can never condone sin. All sexual acts outside of marriage (between one man and one woman) are Mortal Sins. Rom 1:24-27; 1 Cor 6:9-10; 1 Tim 1:10.
    Admonishing sinners, instructing the uniformed, and counseling the doubtful are three of the Spiritual Works of Mercy.
    In the words of Jesus: “Not everyone who says to me, “Lord, Lord,’ shall enter the kingdom of Heaven, but he who does the will of my Father who is in Heaven. On that day many will say to me, ‘Lord, Lord, did we not prophesy in your name, and cast out demons in your name, and do many mighty works in your name?’ And then will I declare to them, “I never knew you; depart from me you evildoers.” Mt 7:21-23.
    In His Mercy, God forgives those who repent, promise to sin no more, and avoid the near occasions of sin.
    Read the “Catechism of the Catholic Church, Second Edition”. “….the Catechism has raised throughout the world, even among non-Christians, and confirms its purpose of being presented as a full, complete exposition of Catholic doctrine, enabling everyone to know what the Church professes, celebrates, lives, and prays in her daily life.” – Pope John Paul II (CCC pg xiv). Pass it on.

  • Tom Perna
    April 26, 2013 Reply

    Cardinal Dolan – what an excellent piece! So glad we have you leading the US Bishops. I am going to share this on Facebook and Twitter. May Our Lord protect you always.

  • Michael Drollman
    April 26, 2013 Reply

    Thank you, Eminence. The faithful need continued encouragement from leadership, as we are assailed daily by the world in it’s continual decline.

  • Brenda S.
    April 26, 2013 Reply

    The Church is not one big Free For All. The Church are those who follow Christ by obeying His teachings. One of the first things Christ taught us was to “take up our cross and follow Him”. Taking up your cross involves self-discipline. First the desire, then the follow through of choosing Christ-like behavior. I will choose NOT to date that married man. I will choose NOT to steal from my employer. I will choose TO give money and time to the poor in my community, etc… Without an intent to Follow Christ as HE ASKED us to follow Him, I have no business, really, pretending I’m seeking a Church community or involvement.

  • Scott Johnston
    April 26, 2013 Reply

    “Christy”, the one married to a divorced Catholic man, says it all. The authority of the Church is mistaken in the basic condemnation of those who are divorced and remarried. When a marriage is dead, it id far better to be merciful and allow the “sinner” to partake in Holy Communion, after confessing one’s sin and regret that the divorce happened. The Church authorities need to encourage people to get on with their lives. I really believe that Jesus would approve! “All are Welcome”?? No, sadly, not all are welcome. So, Cardinal Dolan, it is time for you and your fellow Cardinals to ask Pope Francis to change the rule! And don’t tell me that divorced and remarried Catholic is some sort of obstinate mortal sinner.

  • bmg
    April 26, 2013 Reply

    Thank you Cardinal Dolan.
    Truth spoken in love.
    As a same-sex attracted woman I am eternally grateful for the Truth of the Gospel the Church has handed down. Jesus does love me and He feeds me with himself every time I take the Eucharist. It’s a grace and a privilege to be Catholic.

  • Don
    April 26, 2013 Reply

    Your Eminence:
    With all due respect, your actions don’t match your words. By giving Holy Communion to pro-abortion politicians like Joe Biden, you most certainly are saying “anything goes.” Your actions are scandalous because they defame our Eucharistic Lord and say to the world that abortion really is no big deal. If Biden promoted ripping off the arms and legs of bishops rather than babies, would you feel the same? May God fill you with grace so you will truly respect our Eucharistic Lord and unborn children.

  • Cindy Trainque
    April 26, 2013 Reply

    Hello, Your Eminence! Thank-you so much for this great clarification. I agree with it 100%! It’s not about “bringing the Church into the modern world” by changing Church teachings based on social environments….afterall, it has been around for 2,000+ years for sticking to the Truth of Jesus Christ! There was once one of the social sins that I struggled with…until I found the grace within me to embrace the teachings of the Church entirely that I found new life within me. Sure…it had hurt like crazy to be “pruned” like that but I am but I have been blessed in so many other ways since that surrender to God’s holy will. May God give you much strength and peace as you continue (with all of your brother bishops) to protect and defend the Truth of Jesus Christ and the teachings of our One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic Church!

    In His Peace,

    Cindy

  • Rene
    April 26, 2013 Reply

    Thank you Cardinal Dolan for stating the truth with love. Thank you for not caving in to political correctness and Modernism in the Church.

  • Stefanie
    April 27, 2013 Reply

    As an RCIA director, I truly appreciate your willingness to discuss all issues and to firmly teach what the Church has always taught. Jesus had very tough words about divorce — and it is hard for the Church to judge a sacramentally valid marriage vs. a marriage that is not a valid sacrament. I am grateful that my husband was able to obtain an annulment and that our marriage was convalidated, but I would have accepted a different decision because I respect the Church’s intent over my own will. As John the Baptist said, “He must increase; I must decrease.” We like the Church when She agrees with our will; we don’t like the Church when She won’t go along with our will in order to save our eternal soul from erroneous thinking.
    You are in my daily Lauds prayers.

  • Dex
    April 27, 2013 Reply

    Great post. Any violent reactions to this post clearly doesn’t understand what the good Cardinal is implying. God bless us all.

  • Karen
    April 27, 2013 Reply

    Thank you Cardinal Dolan!

  • Ric Errazo
    April 27, 2013 Reply

    Simply… beautiful.
    Because ‘Truth’ is beauty.

  • Waldo
    April 27, 2013 Reply

    Archbishop Chaput, gave us the same teaching. Defending our “way of life” is defending selfishness,cynicism and lies. The commandment is “go and sin no more” instead of “let me do whatever I want”. Thank you for remaining us what Jesus said.

  • Jon
    April 27, 2013 Reply

    The God you know is “more about love and respect?”. What could be more loving and respectful than telling someone the truth in uncomfortable and difficult circumstances? The Church loves and respects people with an ssa so much, that it is not willing to idly stand by and watch them hurt themselves and their relationship with God… And she is willing to do so despite however unpopular it may make her. This Church teaching, and this post, are selfless as well as loving and respectful.

  • Joseph
    April 27, 2013 Reply

    Thank you your Eminence. Your words shine in this time of confusion.

  • Bob
    April 27, 2013 Reply

    Your Eminence, thank you for these charity-filled words. You and your leadership of the Church on these shores, in regards to her moral and cultural teachings, are so important. I wish more of our “leaders” spoke with such eloquence and education. You are in my prayers. Stay strong in the faith!

  • Robert Hochfelder
    April 27, 2013 Reply

    The Church loves the sinner But, does not love the sin! Many would call that intolerance. It is TRUTH! The word repentance would never be mentioned in scripture if the message of Christ didn’t invoke guilt in the lives of the messages’ recipients. There are LAWS ( GOD’S) that need to be followed if mankind is to dwell one day with the Blessed in heaven. This will mean sacrifice by all, not just some. Christ died for us, will we live and obey him.

    If the Church does not stand for something , as it does, it will fall for anything. This has happened with many others.

  • Joseph Phillips
    April 27, 2013 Reply

    What a hairsplitting argument. Your distinction between what a homosexual “is” — the “condition” (like it’s a skin disease) and what he or she “does” (the “act”) is too facile by half. I believe if you love a homosexual as he or she is — and I’m straight and married, by the way — it can’t be with all kinds of qualifiers and this kind of “this part of you is you, but not that part” quibbling. The adulterous woman of your biblical example was not predestined to be adulterous — it was a choice; I believe LGBT is who you are. And if you define who an LGBT person is as “sinner”, you do not love and welcome them AS THEY ARE.
    I believe, because i see it every day, among numerous friends and acquaintances, that LGBT individuals can be “united in the lifelong, life-giving, faithful, loving bond of marriage.” .Your teaching is clear on how you feel about that. Such teaching is why, despite decades of Catholic school upbringing and all the good I obtained from it, I can no longer be a Catholic. I remain, however, a faithful, loving Christian. God bless you for your thoughts, but I cannot agree in good conscience.

  • Father Joseph Cocucci
    April 27, 2013 Reply

    Your Eminence,
    Thank you for the clarity and beauty with which you express a challenging part of our faith and for the grace with which you treat those who sometimes gracelessly disagree or simply do not understand.

    Father Joe Cocucci (Diocese of Wilmington)

  • Jake
    April 27, 2013 Reply

    Thank you so much, Cardinal Dolan. The many appreciative comments about your article are heartwarming and so richly deserved. I add to their sentiments. The few naysayers I noticed seem mostly to be defenders of same-sex-attraction. My heart aches for them; it must surely be hard. I have always had my types of temptations too. Serious ones. I think the thing that has helped me in those times when I have veered far off the right path is that I haven’t made excuses for my choices, but have admitted to myself that I was doing wrong. That places the blame for my behavior where it belongs, on me, and leaves open the possibility of repentence and reconciliation.

  • Michael
    April 27, 2013 Reply

    Having to recently deal and question my Catholic faith. It is always comforting to realize and remind oneself of the importance and sacrifice that Jesus endured whic ultimately leads to the teachings of our Savior.
    My faith has been restored as of late and I am forever grateful for the continued teachings of the Catholic faith.

  • Doug
    April 27, 2013 Reply

    Thank you your Grace, for your reflection. I would agree that some illegal immigrants have been enticed to come here and have been exploited once they got here. However, too many, citizens and illegal immigrants alike have become used to and exploit many of our generous benefits of a welfare state. I don’t mind supporting the widows and orphans, the weak and disabled, those who have met disastrous misfortunes. I do object to subsidizing those who steal from the poor box. I would hope that you and the Conference of Bishops would be discouraging that behavior. Is it too much to ask that we seal our borders before we get all generous with what we have?

  • Sr. Elizabeth Ann OSF
    April 27, 2013 Reply

    Thank you for this loving and clear message.

  • Bill B.
    April 28, 2013 Reply

    Well stated: full of love and respect. May the Holy Spirit continue to guide His Church. Prayers to you, as surely as always, those who are following the wrong way, putting their feelings before God’s will, will persecute you. The human side of the Church will always suffer the Cross. As the Carthusians say, the Cross remains the same as the world continues to turn. Marana tha.

  • Andrew Humphreys
    April 28, 2013 Reply

    You are an outstanding writer!
    The Catholic Church’s teaching places God’s will as paramount, as opposed to man/woman’s desires. You eloquently also express God’s love for all, and the welcoming love of His Church.
    I think people forget that it is God that sets the “rules”, while the Church helps guide people on the right path.
    Thank you for your guidance in these confusing times.

  • Erwin Carabeo
    April 28, 2013 Reply

    Please help the Diocese of Paranaque in the Philippines. It has been almost a year since the clergy and laity of our diocese have complained to the Nuncio here in the Philippines regarding the irregularities in the handling of the finances of the diocese and no action has been taken. We love the Catholic Church and these are the things that erode the faith of a lot of Catholics.

  • Gary Simmons
    April 28, 2013 Reply

    Well said, Your Eminence. This is why I look forward to RCIA and communion with the Holy Church: finally! Somewhere that engages the world with truth and love.

  • Amma Brigitte
    April 28, 2013 Reply

    Dear Cardinal we are with you and we invite you in our covent Abana diocese de Batroun for a retreat near our Lord! So happy to know you

    All our love and prayer!Pray for us!And Lebanon!

    Amma-mère Brigitte et soeur Laurence Delacroix 009613153721

  • Joel
    April 28, 2013 Reply

    Thank you, Cardinal Dolan. I am fortunate to have happened upon your teachings this afternoon. Bless you.

  • John Ewing
    April 28, 2013 Reply

    I don’t think the hand washing anecdote was actually the point of the story…. But nonetheless, of course you can “wash off” past sin. That’s what happens when we go to church and repent and ask the Lord to give us the strength to never do it again. And that’s why we keep going to church, to stay close to God in order to “stay clean”, and, when we do stumble, and we will, to get clean again. Anyone who says that abortion or homosexuality or fornication can’t be “washed off” is missing the point. Of course they can, but then the whole idea is that you never do it again. People who argue with that logic are really saying that they actually don’t want those specific things to be considered sins. You want to be accepted AND to be allowed to keep on sinning without ever being told you’re sinning. Having your cake and eating it too. That’s not how it works.

  • Val Fister
    April 29, 2013 Reply

    My word that was wonderful! This was so simply put on topics that we the people often complicate just to justify….thank you :) )) “Hate the sin; love the sinner… ” Hope to see you speak in Knoxville later this year God willing! God Bless!!

  • Margaret K.
    April 29, 2013 Reply

    Dear Cardinal Dolan, Thank you for this message. I love how you said that we are a Church where all are welcome, but that does NOT mean “anything goes.” I love the Catholic Church and everything she stands for. When I was a teenager, I thought that the Catholic Church was trying to tell me what to think. After much trial and error, and much studying and considering the serious issues of life, I discovered that what I believe in my heart and soul and mind is exactly what the Church teaches.

    I am saddened to read some of the responses you received that were so negative. The writers of those replies must be very angry people. I noticed that those who are thanking you sound like they are at peace with their lives, with the world, and yes, with the Catholic Church. Me too!

    Many thanks to you for this post.

  • jerrythetrucker
    April 29, 2013 Reply

    Jesus IS the Way. Glad you are here to lead us. Bless you Cardinale.

  • Michael Ferri
    April 29, 2013 Reply

    Your lack of understanding of the human condition is appalling. The dirty hands analogy belies your contempt, ignorance, and down right arrogance regarding a number of groups of people you have in essence “slimed” and consequently attempt to push away from the table that all were invited to. Alcoholics, gays, and young people who “live together” are not dirty, nor are their actions dirty. To be honest, that is really what you are saying. Alcoholics need compassion, understanding, and most of all treatment for their disease not public shaming as you have done – you should know better than that, Cardinal Dolan. The Church’s misguided crusade against expressions of sexuality outside of marriage needs to be re-examined. Insistence on continuing the homophobia and primitive understanding of sexuality of the ancient Hebrew desert nomads into our modern age has produced nothing but pain, alienation, and sorrow for millions of people over the centuries. You have declared your absolute infallibility in these areas but you have not embraced any tempered or more compassionate understanding of these issues based on our God given human intelligence and research that has brought to light many new historical, psychological, archeological, and anthropological insights and understandings in these areas of human sexuality.

    • Mindy M.
      May 29, 2013 Reply

      Powerful.
      Permission to quote you, Michael Ferri?

  • Patricia Haley Ramirez
    April 29, 2013 Reply

    God bless you! It would be so easy to give in to social pressure, sabotage and manipulation, but as a Shepard of men, Cardinal Donal, that’s what you are NOT about. You are our leader, our father in Christ and our conscience. it is a thankless job, but one that we appreciate -and love you for your selfless devotion. Thank you for your words of wisdom, and in the love of our Christ, may the good Lord always bless you. May you feel our arms embracing you. May you never feel loneliness, but feel the gratitude and love of those of us that follow the teachings of the Catholic church. Devotedly. Proudly. And faithfully,.

  • Stan K
    May 1, 2013 Reply

    A week ago Fri. I was driving to go for my daily walk in Fish Creek, here in Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Listening to the Catholic station on sirus. I was so pround of you when you explaind the different rites of the Catholic Church. I believe you said the Eastern was a small part, and it is.. Your explanation was right on. We in the Byzantine Rite are a small but very proud Catholics. Our Rite has not changed much in a thousand years. I so look forward to going to Divine Liturgy each Sunday and smell the incense of the altar and blessings. Thank you Cardinal, have a safe trip (vacation? lol) to France
    Stan

  • Susej Tsirhc
    May 1, 2013 Reply

    “…………, revealed by God in the Bible, through His Son, Jesus, instilled in the human heart, and taught by His Church.”

    Next step is to actually teach out of the Bible. Go back to your first Love (Christ), and not the traditions of men. One last note, it think you left out the atoning Blood of Christ for the remission of sin. There is one mediator between God and man, Christ Jesus. There is no other name under heaven by which we are saved. Jesus said I am The Way ,The truth and The life, no one comes to the Father but bu Me. He is not a way, a trurh and a life. From the above article you would think that Jeses Christ is nothing but a moral teacher whom we shoulfd follow.
    I STRONGLY URGE CATHOLICS TO READ THE BIBLE FOR YOURSELVES AND PUT DOWN THE CATECHISM BOOKS AND MONTHLY MISSALETTES.
    You might be surprised to see what you may find. If anything, read the Gospel of John to see where your relationship with Christ lies. It does not lie with the Pharisees of today who wear the big hats and robes.

    Yours in Christ,
    Susej

    • Matt
      May 9, 2013 Reply

      Susej,

      I’m not Catholic. However, you might want to revisit some of your ideas regarding your seeming go-it-alone attitude as expressed in your post. Christ railed against the legalism and hypocrisy of the Pharisees. He does not rail against the community of believers and the structure that surrounds them that is the Church. The Scriptures speak over and over again of the special place of God’s people and the Church as the Bride of Christ.
      Paul, in 1 Timothy 3:15 said, “…if I am delayed, you will know how people ought to conduct themselves in God’s household, which is the church of the living God, the pillar and foundation of the truth.” Christ intended for all of us to live in relationship with Him as a community of believers with the Church as the foundation of that relationship. That’s why Paul spends time describing the offices of bishop and elder. They serve as the leadership of the Church. While individual members of the Catholic clergy are sinful and some are corrupt, the structure and leadership they provide are Biblical and God-ordained. Moreover, his letters are addressed to individual churches to advise and admonish them as a community as opposed to individually. In Revelation, Christ begins the book with letters to the seven churches.
      Often, we need help in our walk with Christ. Peter warns us against trying to go it alone in our interpretation of Scripture. In 1 Peter 3:16, he cautions (referencing Paul’s letters): “He writes the same way in all his letters, speaking in them of these matters. His letters contain some things that are hard to understand, which ignorant and unstable people distort, as they do the other Scriptures, to their own destruction.”
      What to do? As the Ethiopian eunuch asked, in response to Philip’s question as to whether or not he understood a passage from Isaiah, ” ‘How can I,’ he said, ‘unless someone explains it to me?’ ” Christ, in His wisdom, has provided us with His Bride, the Church and its leadership to aid us in our walk with Him.
      So, please don’t be so quick to judge our Catholic brothers and sisters. There are many, many Christ-centered, and Christ-loving Catholics all around us.

  • Brian
    May 5, 2013 Reply

    Being a straight catholic I have always been torn by the Catholic teachings of others.
    Today my whole family has made the decision to leave the Catholic church. If you have leaders that state so much hate against individuals, what happens if one of my six children is gay? I can’t be part of a place that teaches such hate. I want my children to be filled with love and not know such discriminations.
    Thank you for making our decision easier. Awful post. Awful.

  • Cheryl P.
    May 6, 2013 Reply

    Cardinal Dolan, Thank you for proclaiming the truth

  • Liz
    May 6, 2013 Reply

    My only question is regarding
    Mathew 15:2 and Mathew 7:2. Jesus was not a stickler about this, yet we are much cleaner today with indoor plumbing, sinks everywhere, hand sanitizer everywhere and such. I get the point and I wash my hands several times a day, but what if I happen to forget just before I eat? Does it matter so much? I don’t think Jesus was a germaphobe, I think we should respect each other’s preferences, but not be phobic either.

  • Liz
    May 6, 2013 Reply

    Love You Cardinal Dolan!
    God Bless You!

  • Gary Herndon
    May 7, 2013 Reply

    For years I followed the Christian Belief,since I was born into it because of my parents.Every Sunday we went to church & on weekends the youth group gathered for events.as of 1979,I gave all that up due in fact to the church saying I couldn’t be who I wanted to be and I was Forced to follow the Christian belief. Thats where it all STOPPED.Since then I have been free to choose my own path.I am a Pagan and have been since I stopped the FORCED CHRISTIAN belief.I am not Gay but I support LGBT community.I support LGBT Rights & Equality and Freedom To Marry whoever they want. It is not the Catholic Church’s place to decide who should marry whom, it is a place to where the Catholic Church should Welcome All Without Conditions. If it is a House of God then let God decide not his/her Human servants….”God do you have an answer”? Hello? Hello? Guess he or she is out to lunch

  • Irene
    May 30, 2013 Reply

    Pope Francis gave a beautiful sermon last Saturday where he emphasized how all are welcome n the Church; he said that Jesus is indignant when we exclude people, that Jesus loves all people so much. The Pope prayed that all who come to the Church will find the doors open.

  • Fr Bernie
    July 19, 2013 Reply

    What is missing here is that God inspired the writing of the Bible, He didn’t write it. It was written when customes, times and knowledge were different. This is why even though the Bible tells to have slaves, stone the adulterous, forbid many other things, we ignore. Why, because it is not that time any longer. I pray this Bishop and all of the RC Church listen to the teaching of Christ which is Love, nothing else, just love. Thank God the Supreme Court made these rulings and now the rest of the States need to follow. Today England just joined most civilized countries is supporting and allowing gay marriage because it is the right thing to do. God made us different for a reason and doesn’t want us not to love. Peace & Love.

  • Bethany
    November 24, 2013 Reply

    When I read other articles about what some LGBT people did in front of a Catholic Church in New York in response to this post, I expected what you wrote to be far more inflammatory and bigoted than it was. In fact, your words never once seemed to come out of spite, ignorance, or hatred. That said, I do have a small problem with your post. You stated that you and your friend (representing the sinners) must wash their hands before they come to the table (representing the church). If anything, shouldn’t the church be a place for people with dirty hands? What is the point of the Church if not teach people the way to make their hands clean? The way I understand it, the church is more of an AA Meeting than an awards ceremony for morality. I understand what you mean about judging the sin, not the sinner. However, this is not at all what you are actually advocating. You are advocating judgment of the sinner- just not the hypocritical kind. You judge someone claim some of their actions are sinful. This isn’t necessarily wrong. It is how one responds to a judgment that can possibly be wrong. You can lovingly tell someone that what they are doing is wrong without sinning yourself. However, you cannot exclude them, nor think that you are any better. I didn’t get that impression from your post, but perhaps some people did.

  • Marion Solomon
    December 2, 2013 Reply

    This morning as I was preparing for my Monday morning Novena to ther Blessed Mother, I was stopped by your image on a TV news program. I was taught to believe that human life is the most important truth that should be defended over all things and that you can judge the character of a man by how he views the life of the human being from the conception of the baby in the womb until the end of their natural life. This is the way I view our dear president whom has no value for the human person. He does not think that a young girl should ruin their lives with an unwanted pregancy and that the child is just a mere inconvience. He even believes that it is OK to kill a baby that is delivered alive after a botched abortion. This is why it is upsetting to me when you say that you can support this ?man,president and are upset that his policies go against the Church. This is no suprise and it is very disturbing that a man in your powerful position supposedly representing Jesus’s view here on earth could ever make this statement. Your concern and love for the human person should far outweigh any monetary benifit that this “evil” man could offer. It is clear that something is wrong if you can support someone who has no value for human life and that this adminstration is not concerned about anyone’s welfare but ther own. They are about to instate euthanasia along with limiting and preventing wanted births. I spend my life in prayer for my fellow man and I cry for the unborn and those who are going to be exterminate in the near future. Please listen carefully try to look at the situation and how it is going to impact life and keep the value of life in your prayers. Ask for the Blessed Mother’s help she is listening to your prayers. I know she answers my prayers all the time. Pray for life.. You will not get this wrong.

  • joe gaglio
    January 13, 2014 Reply

    Has the Pope and the bishops ever conscreate Russia to the Imucalte Heart of Mary? if so when? if not why not?

 

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