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  • Maureen McCormack
    October 29, 2009 Reply

    Well, Congratulations, Archbishop Dolan! Of course the Times would not print it. It rings of too much truth and in their selective “blindness” they do not see or even seek the truth. Thank you for always proclaiming truth in such an intelligent and sensitive way. I pray you will have many years ahead to lead us all to that truth.

  • Irene Baldwin
    October 29, 2009 Reply

    I just e-mailed the NY Times’ public editor this blog posting, suggesting that it’s something he might want to take a look at.(For anyone who doesn’t know, the Times’ public editor is kind of an independent ombudsman who, among other things, keeps an eye on the paper’s reporting practices).

  • Oscar Ortiz
    October 29, 2009 Reply

    Archbishop Dolan, great commentary. but what is even worse is the fact that there is also a lot of anti-God sentiment as well. now atheists are running subway ads, saying that people are better off without God. we live in a secular world with absolutely no religion or faith in anything. but we can fight back. for example i saw an ad in amny with a great quote by Padre Pio: “you don’t believe in God, don’t worry. God believes in you.” what a nice charitable way of responding to those who don’t believe in God!

  • Jay in JCMo.
    October 29, 2009 Reply

    Archbishop Dolan — Thank you for speaking up so precisely and eloquently. What you say is absolutely true. The reason for it is that certain people in very high places are very uncomfortable with the challenging, Christ-centered, reality-based message we preach. They call us names and undermine us in every way possible in order to undermine the truth that is at odds with their view of the world. Jesus Himself knows exactly how all of that feels. But we already know the end of the story — that evil will not prevail.

  • Roy Petitfils
    October 29, 2009 Reply

    Archbishop Dolan, thank you for sharing your gifts with the Church, especially your great mind, penchant for the written and spoken word and jovial personality. I too think Cardinal Regali will be disappointed in the WS outcome!

  • danielle cummings
    October 29, 2009 Reply

    Your Excellency, Reading your blog made me proud to be a Catholic and a Catholic Communicator. You have verbalized what many of us have been stating for some time! I applaud your courage to submit it to the Times and then post it on your blog. Thank you for speaking the truth.

  • David
    October 29, 2009 Reply

    I find the self-pitying and egotistical tone of this post quite breathtaking. I notice that the Archbishop fails to link to any of the articles he takes issue with (though he uses links selectively elsewhere on his blog). Here’s what Dowd says about the Pope. Strong stuff – but is any of it untrue? In 2004, the cardinal who would become Pope Benedict XVI wrote a Vatican document urging women to be submissive partners, resisting any adversarial roles with men and cultivating “feminine values” like “listening, welcoming, humility, faithfulness, praise and waiting.” “Nuns need to be even more sepia-toned for the über-conservative pope, who was christened “God’s Rottweiler” for his enforcement of orthodoxy. Once a conscripted member of the Hitler Youth, Benedict pardoned a schismatic bishop who claimed that there was no Nazi gas chamber. He also argued on a trip to Africa that distributing condoms could make the AIDS crisis worse.

  • Justin in Ohio
    October 29, 2009 Reply

    This was a great op-ed piece, Your Excellency. Perhaps you could consider submitting it (or an alternative version of it) to another media outlet for publication (Wall Street Journal, another NY daily paper, or a non-newspaper like the Weekly Standard, First Things, the National Review, etc.). Don’t give up and keep fighting the good fight to defend our Holy Mother Church.

  • John Nason
    October 29, 2009 Reply

    Archbishop Dolan: Bullseye! And I hope that the Times’ public editor sees fit to weigh in on this flagrant anti-Catholic prejudice, as one responder suggests. Meanwhile, I suggest that the Times is not the only New York newspaper deserving of the Dolan skewering for the same reason. John Nason

  • Nick Stuart
    October 29, 2009 Reply

    My protestant family history runs all the way back to Jan Hus, and it’s not likely we’re going to be coming back anytime soon. That said, I am pained by attacks on Catholics as much as if I were one myself. To illustrate with a scene from 1953 movie Titanic. The ship has hit the iceberg and is on its way to the bottom. Two crewman running down the deck come across a priest leading a group kneeling on the deck in prayer. The first crewman says to the second “Let’s pray.” The second crewman says “But we’re not Catholic.” The first crewman says, as he pulls the second one down to kneel on the deck “What difference does that make now?” In a time when our moral culture has hit the iceberg, this country needs the Catholic church.

  • Frank Murphy
    October 29, 2009 Reply

    Archbishop Dolan, thank you for this. This is a serious topic that gets little or no discussion and it is great to see it addressed by the Chruch. My question is this: Why don’t we hear about this from the pulpit?

  • elizabeth
    October 29, 2009 Reply

    Kudos! I hope your blog will be one that the editors of the “paper of record” check regularly. The anti-Catholic bias of the Times is one reason I haven’t read the newspaper in decades.

  • Sr. Joan L. Roccasalvo, C.S.J.
    October 29, 2009 Reply

    It is time for our Catholic leaders to name the virulent attacks against the Church as “Catholic hate-speech.” What other faith-tradition would permit or tolerate it! Thank you, Archbishop.

  • Matthew Hennessey
    October 29, 2009 Reply

    Archbishop Dolan — Thank you for this. You are right about all of it, of course, but your analysis of the shameful rantings of Ms. Dowd, whose editors must simply wave her copy through without even reading it, is especially acute. Even the most uncritical reader would have to conclude that she, and the Times, have lost the plot when it comes to the Church. We are grateful to have you here in New York. I look forward to reading more in this space.

  • Gayle Miller
    October 29, 2009 Reply

    I have long railed against the often mindless and almost automatic prejudice expressed against my church by various ignorant people. Since I know I am far from perfect, I refrain from answering a lot of the nonsense because it’s just stupid. But oh how I wish that I was fortunate enough to have Archbishop Dolan within Sunday Mass distance. I think those who are fortunate enough to have his wise counsel and robust beliefs are very much better for it.

  • Fr. John Zuhlsdorf o{]:¬)
    October 29, 2009 Reply

    Many thanks for going public on this important issue. Thank you for standing up.

  • sayuri
    October 29, 2009 Reply

    I myself have experienced anti- catholic sentiment at work and with friends.. I’m put in the position of defending the church. In every religion there are good and bad, why do they see the catholic church as a gaint monster. We are being treated unfairly. Your excellency we will pray them.

  • His Prince Michael
    October 29, 2009 Reply

    Wow. From the individual who shamelessly pandered to the public with ALL things temporal: “….The Church says yes to EVERYTHING….” THAT “statement” alone, is probably MORE “anti-Catholic” than ANYTHING ever said by a critic. Whoever made the comment “Bullseye” was at-least half-correct.

  • Brian Besong
    October 29, 2009 Reply

    Keep them coming, Your Excellency!

  • Sarah P. Keenan
    October 29, 2009 Reply

    Your Excellancy- Thanks for a wonderful article and great national leadership. You have a fan in Texas.

  • Deacon John M. Bresnahan
    October 29, 2009 Reply

    I am just finishing an excellent book on this topic by Bill Donohue of the Catholic Civil Rights League. It is titled: “Secular Sabotage.” The anti-Catholic sewage flowing in our society he describes is amazing. And I know Donohue is not exaggerating because I remember all his examples from when they were in the news.

  • Teresa
    October 29, 2009 Reply

    Your Excellency, thank you for posting this. I live in California and we have problems of our own. I hope your text will reach to the West and continue to wake up and unite all Catholics.

  • Jerry Colby
    October 29, 2009 Reply

    Your Excellency, Thank GOD A BISHOP has decided to speak up everyday!!We Catholics need to be taught everyday.. When we have a Bishop that defends Mother Church it makes us proud to be Catholics. I BEG you to use the Pulpit to teach, defend, inspire Catholics to learn, repent, and also defend. Authority was given to you and the rest of the Bishops. Please explain the teachings of the church and why they were meant for all eternity not to be changed for the current times. I pray that God uses you to bring CATHOLIC back to the Catholic church in the public forum. God Bless, I will pray everyday for you and all the Priests. Sincerely, Jerry Colby

  • Ron Fischer
    October 29, 2009 Reply

    When I read about attacks against the Catholic Church, like those you have chronicled here, I find great solace in the words of Jesus, as recorded in the gospel of Matthew, Chapter 5, versus 10 – 12: “Blessed are they who are persecuted for the sake of righteousness, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven. Blessed are you when they insult you and persecute you and utter every kind of evil against you (falsely) because of me. Rejoice and be glad, for your reward will be great in heaven. Thus they persecuted the prophets who were before you.” We are clearly under serious attack by the secular world, and have been for some considerable time. The Catholic Church stands out, often times singularly, in opposition to the constant tearing down of the God created fabric of life by those that wish to create a new and disturbingly evil new world order. Thanks to you, and other good and faithful Bishops like you, the good Word is still being preached “to the ends of the earth.” Take care, God bless, and keep up the good fight!

  • Michael Roger
    October 29, 2009 Reply

    It is about time we heard from someone more credible than the buffoon over at the Catholic Anti-Defamation League, even though his job is necessary too. We need to have this conversation throughout America, from every pulpit. Of course, all the while reminding ourselves of our Creed, the Beatitudes, and the perfect freedom of obedience and admonishing ourselves for our sins, both prominent and those yet to be seen. And if you need encouragement, remember also, We’ve been through worse. This is nothing compared to those first three hundred years (when the Church grew the most!).

  • Michael K
    October 29, 2009 Reply

    The mainstream media is but one offensive threat in the developing “new crusades”. Some may contend the Church go underground to preserve our faith until the army of moral relativism and the new political class extinguish themselves through the practice of abortion, same-sex marriage, and euthanasia. Kudos to the likes of Archbishop Dolan and Archbishop Chaput for taking the fight right back to the enemy and standing firm on principle. We need visible leaders of the Church out front leading the debate and demonstrating that 60M Catholics are not going to lay down our faith and moral foundation for the sake of political correctness and socialized governance. This battle will intensify in the coming years as the only way the Obama administration can implement their core communistic strategy is to marginalize and eventually eliminate the Catholic Church from American life, as we are the strongest voice of truth and reason; two undeniable tools of war that cannot be defeated.

  • MAM
    October 29, 2009 Reply

    Kudos to the good Archbhisop!

  • dorotella
    October 29, 2009 Reply

    St. John Chrysostom St. John Chrysostom writes And why, then, passing by the others, does He converse with Peter on these things? (John 21:15). He was the chosen one of the Apostles, and the mouth of the disciples, and the leader of the choir. On this account, Paul also went up on a time to see him rather than the others (Galatians 1:18). And withal, to show him that he must thenceforward have confidence, as the denial was done away with, He puts into his hands the presidency over the brethren. And He brings not forward the denial, nor reproches him with what had past, but says, ‘If you love me, preside over the brethren,’ …and the third time He gives him the same injunction, showing at what a price He sets the presidency over His own sheep. And if one should say, ‘How then did James receive the throne of Jerusalem?,’ this I would answer that He appointed this man (Peter) teacher, not of that throne, but of the whole world.” (Chrysostom, In Joan. Hom. lxxxviii. n. 1, tom. viii)

  • Tony de New York
    October 29, 2009 Reply

    Muy Querido Arzobispo: Gracias por defender nuestra fe Catolica. Cum Petro et sub Petro, Tony de New York.

  • Michael
    October 29, 2009 Reply

    Your Excellency–A well done commentary except for one point: your reference to Pope Benedict’s outreach to “former Catholics.” I assume you are referring to the the four bishops of the SSPX. They were and still are Roman Catholics, as are the Faithful who these good bishops tend to as their flock. God love you.

  • rose lewis
    October 29, 2009 Reply

    Thank you so much for the commentary. As you have stated it’s not only the NYT but it seems every paper has open season on the Catholic Church. It is also the reason my husband and I do not subscribe to the Times anymore or to the Dalles Morning News. I thank God you are fighting back this needs to happen at a national level. I hope other bishops have the courage to do the same. Thank you and God bless you.

  • Micah Sittig
    October 29, 2009 Reply

    Sounds like something for the Ombudsman, not for the Times Op-Ed page http://topics.nytimes.com/top/opinion/thepubliceditor/index.html

  • Dn. Albert Amato (Armenian Church) Buffalo
    October 29, 2009 Reply

    Where there is the Greatest GOOD, there is the greatest Evil attempting to bring ruination. These media attacks are lashes upon the Body of Christ, the Church. As long as we have Mother Cabrini, Dorothy Day, Bp. Sheen, Cardinal Cooke, Fr. Groeschel and you Excellency, the Church in New York will stand firm, grow, and Christ’s time, prevail. Hoping to see you in Buffalo for the Cure’ of Ars event on Nov. 08. I hope you enjoyed the hospitality of Archbishop Khajag Barsamian at St. Vartan Armenian Cathedral! Dn Al Amato, a Roman Rite Catholic, married to and serving in ecumenical love the Armenian Church as well as my local Catholic Parish

  • George Welborn
    October 29, 2009 Reply

    I don’t think there is anything wrong with being anti-Catholic. As a Protestant I must stand for truth and expose the heresy of Rome. For example the Papacy is a 6th century invention. Transubstantiation is pure fiction. The forgered and interpolated writings of so many church fathers all need to be exposed. The Catholic church is the source of much of the liberalism in America. Catholics overwhelmingly vote Democratic and have the higher rates of Alcoholism than the general public. So when the Catholic church gets rid of her pagan sacrifices, ineffective sacraments, and other Medieval inventions, I will finally become pro-Catholic

  • Kyle
    October 29, 2009 Reply

    I agree with what you have stated. If only people can realize that God loves everyone, and that there is no need to criticize others because no one is perfect. I also agree that anything that goes on in the Catholic Church makes news, and even though there are more serious topics, somehow they get pushed to the side. I can’t understand how people expect the Catholic Church to agree with something about health care that does not follow our religion or our beliefs. Thank You for standing up and bringing this matter out in the open. Thank you for standing up for our faith even though there are others that try to bring us down for no good reason. Your words are strong and speak out to everyone who reads them.

  • Juan Rodriguez – Defenders of the Holy Trinity
    October 29, 2009 Reply

    YOU GO SPIRITUAL PAPA OF NEW YORK!!! DO IT AGAIN!!!! This is better then watching the World Series!!!!

  • Amy P.
    October 29, 2009 Reply

    First, to Nick Stuart: Thank you for your kind words. This: In a time when our moral culture has hit the iceberg, this country needs the Catholic church. is especially heartwarming. Thank you. Archbishop Dolan: Thank you for this commentary. Thank you for speaking honestly to the constant, non-stop, anti-Catholic bias that pervades our media and culture (and has been a part of American culture, sadly, since this nation’s inception). But rest assured that those of us Catholics who see this criticism and vitriol do not let it shake our faith; I believe wholeheartedly that THIS is the sort of attacking that Christ Himself said we would endure for following Him. The more attacks levied against the Catholic Church, the more I’m convinced this is the One, True faith.

  • Michael
    October 29, 2009 Reply

    Excellent! Thank you and God Bless you Archbishop Dolan.

  • Ruth Brooks in STL
    October 30, 2009 Reply

    Thank you for trying, Archbishop Dolan.

  • Ed
    October 30, 2009 Reply

    Archbishop Dolan, I am not surprised that the NYT has declined to publish your remarks. To very slightly paraphrase famous remarks made in an entirely different context: “These are hard sayings. Who can bear it ?”

  • Nick Milos – Archdiocese of Seattle
    October 30, 2009 Reply

    Well said, Your Excellency! And thanks to New Advent for linking to this blog.

  • Kathryn
    October 30, 2009 Reply

    Archbishop Dolan, Thank you for calling out the attacks on the Catholic Church. Even though the Times has not published your article, maybe another media outlet will. We are so blessed to have your leadership in these times. Our family will pray for you.

  • Brett Adams
    October 30, 2009 Reply

    Thank you, Your Excellency! As a convert to Catholicism in the South, we often hear anti-Catholicism as a way of life. However, with Bishops like Archbishop Gregory and yourself to shephard us, we don’t have much to fear.

  • CO
    October 30, 2009 Reply

    Well, if I know the Catholic blogosphere, this article will reach more readers than The Times could’ve, had it manned up to editorial parity.

  • John Jakubczyk
    October 30, 2009 Reply

    The constant attack on the Church and Church leaders is fueled by the left’s hatred of the Church for standing up for life. It goes all the way back to the 60s when the Church would not officially cave in on birth control. Then when aborion was legalized, the Church refused to be silent. THe effort to destroy the church will continue until we Catholics stand up and say ENOUGH. Catholic voters must vote ONLY for pro-lifer candidates and the Church hierarchy must finally draw the line in front of the Church steps and tell the dissident politicians that if they will not defend life, they are not in communion with the Body of Christ. Perhaps they won’t care, but you will see such a positive response from the Faithful throughout the land. For we are waiting for warriors to stand up and defend that which is Good, True and Beautiful. Thank you for your remarks. Pax et Bonum

  • Doug Sirman
    October 30, 2009 Reply

    “Yet the Times did not demand what it has called for incessantly when addressing the same kind of abuse by a tiny minority of priests: release of names of abusers, rollback of statute of limitations, external investigations, release of all records, and total transparency.” Yes, and if the orthodox Jewish community had a governing hierarchy with a decades-long history of lying, obstruction of justice, and a pattern of legal attacks against the victims, but not the perps, your pathetic whining might be taken more seriously. But the fact is, neither you, nor any other American Bishop have the courage to admit that the scandal was not caused by perverted priests, but by venal, self-serving Bishops, a clear majority of whom who were more than willing to sacrifice someone else’s children to their own agenda of lying, coverups and obfuscation. BTW, this is your cue to trot out that oh-so-useful lie about “the best science of the time…”, I entered the Church two years ago. It wasn’t because of lies like this one.

  • Bryce Bellinder
    October 30, 2009 Reply

    Thank you Archbishop Dolan for giving aggrieved Catholics, and liberty loving people frustrated by the US media, an example of true leadership. By responding to the lack of integrity (or outright bias) in the New York Times you allow many frustrated people to let go of their anger knowing that someone is willing to speak up for their rights. You also give us an excellent example of how to deal with bigots: cite the facts directly to them in a firm and respectful way and by their response, see what type of people they really are. Thank you also for your continued dedication to save souls from the deceptive traps of this world. I pity the New York Times if the day comes when you grow silent, walk away from them, and wipe the dust from your feet.

  • Marie Vasta
    October 30, 2009 Reply

    Archbishop Dolan… So many Catholics need to see and hear their Shepherds stand firm in defense of their faith and speak the truth in charity .. as you and some other faithful Bishops have done… Jesus is truth ..and He himself tells us , if they persecuted Him they will certainly persecute those that follow Him .. Society today considers truth to be less then kind , even unmerciful… when in fact, it is mercy itself as our Holy Father stated in his new encyclical “Caritas in Veritate” (Charity in Truth) . Those who are in union with the Pope will continue to be persecuted , even from within…But we are promised that “the gates of hell will not prevail against the Church” and this is what gives us hope and peace .. That is why , our Shepherds need to come forward as you have done and shine Christ light …defending His Church in Truth… Thank you & may our precious Lord continue to bless and protect you as you are obedient to Christ call ..to lead & protect His flock… In His love.. Marie Vasta S.F.O. †

  • Michael Cowtan
    October 30, 2009 Reply

    You brought this on yourselves. The Bishops lied about the abuse, They refused to accept the advice they were given years ago. They continue to blame the whole thing on “gay culture”. Even when they know it happened they deny, deny, deny. They fight the abused right up to the time it goes to court, and then settle. The Vatican transfer clerics to Rome to avoid the lime light. The vast majority of us, raised Catholic, no longer trust a word you say.

  • Terri Telepak
    October 30, 2009 Reply

    Archbishop Dolan, thank you for your advocacy and Catholic voice! It’s the Times’ loss that they chose not to publish your “Foul Ball” article. It would have fit so well into World Series week and called people’s attention to the media’s anti-Catholic bias. Your write with courage and conviction, humilty and great honesty. I pray that there is a wise publisher (Wall Street Journal, USA Today, America Magazine) that will share your insights with their readers. You have an eloquent gift for touching hearts with your words. Thank you for the gospel you proclaim in this digital age. Your message reaches more than Catholics, and as a Catholic, I am honored to support you in prayer. People are listening. It might feel at times like you are voice crying in the wilderness, but keep on trusting that God is using your voice!

  • Livia Fiordelisi
    October 30, 2009 Reply

    As a faithful Catholic, I do hope that we can grow up and stop the whining. We are NOT discriminated against in any meaningful way and we do enough harm to our own. We were promised a difficult road as disciples. Walk it and stop complaining. And remember to love your enemies along the way.

  • Chuck in Cheyenne, Wyoming
    October 30, 2009 Reply

    This article was inspired; a masterful response to a growing epidemic in our country that has been ignored by many, including many of those who claim that they will not discriminate based upon race, creed, or national origin. Also, thank you to Nick Stuart for his kind words above. We are in a culture war right now, and we must stand together in solidarity to face the common threat. I can’t thank you enough, Mr. Stuart.

  • DM Reed in Ohio
    October 30, 2009 Reply

    Thank you for the couragious post, Your Excellency. Keep fighting the good fight. I strongly encourage you to submit your article for publication in other newspapers or magazines. The faithful need a strong voice like yours, to push back against the disingenuous forces that peddle in anti-Catholic bigotry. Like Christ, we too are hated because of our Faith.

  • Editor
    October 30, 2009 Reply

    Editor’s Note: The links to the corresponding New York Times articles have been added.

  • Irene Baldwin
    October 30, 2009 Reply

    One silver lining to Maureen Dowd’s column is that it brought attention to an issue that a lot of folks wouldn’t have otherwise known about. After I first learned through Dowd’s column of the proposed Vatican visitation of American nuns, I then went to some credible Catholic websites to learn more about it. I think its something worth discussing and I hope that happens on a later blog.

  • Patricia Marks
    October 30, 2009 Reply

    Dear Archbishop, there is another sad manifestation of anti-Catholicism in some circumstances around the murder of Fr. Ed Hines in Chatham, NJ. A hate group which is anti-Catholic and anti-priest willbe on hand at the funeral. Some sympathized with the murdere, though today we learn that he has a criminal record involving children. Thanks for speaking up. God Bless YOu,

  • Derk Burrus
    October 30, 2009 Reply

    Livia, Regarding your comment, “please stop whining”, I disagree that the constant Catholic Bashing is not meaning full discrimination. I’m trying to raise my kids, and the very air they breath is anti-catholic. Secondly, It is not whining to defend one’s self against false accusations. your comment that we do enough harm to our own has a bitter tone. Speak for yourself–there are a billion catholics.

  • Tim – Diocese of Fargo
    October 30, 2009 Reply

    Beautiful and accurate piece, Archbishop Dolan! But we also need to recognize the nature of truth and the world’s constant and negative reaction to it. Fr Bill Halbing says there are two institutions that recognize the primacy of the Catholic Church, and one of those is … the media! If we are not learning to accept being singled out, attacked, despised, then we are not doing what Christ has asked of us. In the end, God wins, and if we are with Christ, so do we.

  • Melissa
    October 30, 2009 Reply

    FANTASTIC blog, Archbishop! As a writer, I commend not only the truth contained, but also the style! “I guess my own background in American history should caution me not to hold my breath.” I love this line! Keep on defending us, your Church militant/faithful!

  • Mary Greene
    October 30, 2009 Reply

    Hello Archbishop Dolan from the Catholic catacombs of NY. We hear you. Our thanks goes beyond words for your defense of Holy Mother. And for your earlier Kennedy correction as well. We take heart that a big holy guy like you is ready to lead us into the public square again. We pray every day for you and for the grace to follow.

  • Fr. John Jay Hughes
    October 30, 2009 Reply

    Right on, Tim! Your priestly brothers in St. Louis are proud of you!!

  • Mary Greene
    October 30, 2009 Reply

    Hello Archbishop Dolan from the Catholic catacombs of NY. We hear you. Our thanks goes beyond words for your defense of Holy Mother. And for your earlier Kennedy correction as well. We take heart that a big holy guy like you is ready to lead us into the public square again. We pray every day for you and for the grace to follow.

  • Clint W. Green
    October 30, 2009 Reply

    That there is an anti-Catholic bias in the press, in society as a whole, should not come as any surprise. After all, the fullness of divine revelation is contained in the teaching of the Church and, when she is at her best, she is the most potent weapon in the war against evil and the Evil One. Moreover, His Grace is correct when he says that there is room for legitimate criticism of the Church, though she is guided by the Holy Spirit, she is also made up of sinful human beings. However, legitimate criticism is one thing, hateful attacks on the Church, such as those lodged by Ms. Dowd, are another. The Church has a right to defend herself and her people from unfounded attack and His Grace is right to do so. Moreover, the Church has an obligation to testify to the truth and His Grace was correct in pointing out the outright lies of those in the press and in society. His Grace, Archbishop Dolan, is standing in defense of the Church and her people, not from legitimate critique, but from prejudice and hateful invective and may God bless him richly for his courage in doing so.

  • P.J.
    October 30, 2009 Reply

    His Excellency, Archbishop Timothy M. Dolan: The following seriously warrants your immediate attention: On Sunday evening 10/25/09 a popular sitcom on cable channel HBO aired a segment in which the Jewish lead character/writer/producer urinates on a picture of Jesus Christ hanging on the wall of a bathroom in a Catholic home. If this had been done to a picture of the Grand Rebbe Menachem Mendel Schneerson, a Mezuzah, Menorah, Yarmulke, Star of David, or a picture of Mecca, Muhammad, the results would be catastrophic….the Jews would yell anti-Semite and the Muslims would order a fatwah and kill the offender. Yet the Catholic Church and the Christians sit back and tolerate it. Please do something about this! Thank you.

  • Deacon Randy Smith
    October 30, 2009 Reply

    Archbishop Dolan: Thanks for your powerful prose in standing up to anti-catholic bigotry in the public sphere: we definitely could challenge the local papers hre back home in St. Louis to print your piece. This is something I would like to see printed in teh local paper here in Washington, Mo.,and in the St. Louis papers, where there is a huge representation of the Catholic Faithful. It’s good to see we have some Bishops in and from St. Louis like Yourself, Burke, Carlson, and Herman who aren’t afraid to speak out in behalf of the Church. We, the people, need such leadership all over the world! Deacon Randy Smith

  • Michael Cowtan
    October 30, 2009 Reply

    You brought this on yourselves. The Bishops lied about the abuse, They refused to accept the advice they were given years ago. They continue to blame the whole thing on “gay culture”. Even when they know it happened they deny, deny, deny. They fight the abused right up to the time it goes to court, and then settle. The Vatican transfer clerics to Rome to avoid the lime light.The vast majority of us, raised Catholic, no longer trust a word you say.

  • Scott
    October 30, 2009 Reply

    I would love to have an autographed photo of yourself. Thanks for your faithfulness and love of the Catholic Church. God bless!

  • Phil Brady
    October 30, 2009 Reply

    My concern rests not so much with the NY Times and other liberal oriented media outlets outside the Church but with the many anti-catholic priests, religious and lay ministers who roam around INSIDE the Catholic Church. These heretics seem to be exposed only after they do harm! They have the audacity to go against the Holy Father but not the courage to leave.

  • Father Norbert
    October 30, 2009 Reply

    Archbishop Dolan makes worthwhile points about a number of issues. What all of us human beings, especially we Catholics, need to be aware of is that wrongdoing (=sin) rots a person from the inside out; its destruction begins on the inside and moves into the outside. To repent requires that the sinner change his/her conduct for the better. The Catholic church is paying a BIG price for the past wrongdoing of a few of her clerics.

  • Little Bear
    October 30, 2009 Reply

    Archbishop Dolan—Maureen Dowd’s article may not have been written with the niceties that the Archdiocese of NY would have liked. But she gave a darn good description of what the investigation of American Sisters are about. And she presented it in a manner that the average Catholic could understand. Many of them had no idea that this was being conducted. Believe me, many of them are very, very angry. The Bishops, like the sexual abuse scandals, brought this anger on themselves—with all the secrecy. In today’s society—transparency is the name of the game. God has nothing to do with the dirty-dealing that the Bishops are into up to their ears. I hope that she and many others keep hammering away at you and the other Bishops.

  • Joe Schmo
    October 30, 2009 Reply

    Archbishop Dolan is a stand up guy and bishop. I’m glad you wrote this!!

  • Don Schenk
    October 30, 2009 Reply

    What gets me is that Archbishop Dolan pointed out how widespread–and ignored–accusations of sexual abuse by Orthodox Jewish rabbis are, yet we still get someone posting that the bishops deserve being bashed because sexual abuse is supposed to be a particularily Catholic problem. The fact is that bishops do keep records about accusations against priests, and that is why lawyers sift through them. (Other religious bodies [e.g., The Southern Baptist Convention, Orthodox Jews] maintain a “don’t ask, don’t tell” attitude and so keep no records for lawyers to sift through.)

  • Michelle
    October 30, 2009 Reply

    Great job Archbishop!

  • Ryan Haber
    October 30, 2009 Reply

    Your Excellency, Thank you for your very good piece. I am so grateful to God for your leadership in NY. You and Cardinal George are very reliable pastors whose guidance and example have been constantly trustworthy. God bless and protect you. If I recall, on 16 Oct, the day that the NYT ran on its front page the piece about the Franciscan, it ran on its twelfth or thirteenth page a current piece about a current sex scandal in the public schools. Of course the NYT is very viciously anti-Catholic. Anti-Catholicism comes from progressives in this country, as it always has. Now those attitudes are also generated among the the tremendous number of lapsed Catholics with plagued consciences. Orthodox Jews are too small a minority to be threatening to the progressivist agenda. The public schools are part-and-parcel of the progressivist agenda. For this project they have quietly and carefully enlisted the support, or fiercely and loudly shouted down the dissent, of every other sizable organization. Alone in the West, the Church speaks out against this Tower of Babel they are constructing, this brave new world they are trying to build. Especially among dissenting or lapsed Catholics, such as Ms. Dowd, troubled consciences no doubt stir the waters. It is natural to hate what tells you that you are wrong. So they hate us because we are good. Would that it were so simple. We have certainly given them plenty of scandal. If we had, as a community, conducted ourselves better, then they would have less to shout at us about. I am not hear blaming anyone. The sex scandals are the most obvious examples: some clergy did very bad things. Other clergy covered it up or feigned ignorance. People in the pew very often suspected or knew that something was wrong with Fr. Cool, and said or did nothing. Police very often gave special treatment where a simple filing of charges would have been in order. If we had not given them such material, our enemies might very well still lie, as they did against our Lord, but at least the stones they hurl against us would not be truths and half-truths, only lending credibility to their throwers. It is irresponsible and aside from the point to try to point fingers: “But the public schools are worse than us!” True, very true. But the guilt of others has nothing to do with out guilt. And it is a sad commentary that nobody expects them to be better. It is a backhanded compliment that they DO expect us to be better. And better we should be. The manly thing to do, the brave and faithful thing, is to accept responsibility and beatings, and to continue to speak and defend truth, to live charity, without shame or fear while we do our penance and continue to convert the world to Christ. Ryan Haber Kensington, Maryland

  • Catholic Defender (Defenders of the Catholic Faith)
    October 30, 2009 Reply

    I see this on several different levels from the liberal media to fundamentalist Protestants. Their is a unique marriage here. The Catholic Church has a great weapon to counter all this is she chooses to use it. We have the truth! We need to get back to the basics in living out our Faith with humility and confidence. Also we need to take a stand whenever this evil rises up. I personally have seen people 180 degrees opposed to the Church finally convert once they were able to see the truth!

  • Bonaventure Stephen Gomes
    October 30, 2009 Reply

    The first time I saw Archbishop Dolan on EWTN at his installation ceremony as Archbishop of New York diocese, I was impressed with his simplicity, warmth and his outgoing personality. Ofcourse, his homily at the event took my breath away. Honestly, I have enjoyed reading the New York Times and devoured all its Sunday Magazines. I live as an expatriate in Dhahran, Saudi Arabia. I am not an American. I am a Catholic. And I am proud of you Archbishop Dolan. It is a shame for the Editors of The New York Times to reject the op-ed. Now, I know why America shuns good and respected leaders. New York favors men who break the commandments. They follow the eleventh: Thou shall not get caught.

  • Fr. Ramon Decaen
    October 30, 2009 Reply

    The Archbishop is to be applauded. He articulated observations that many of us have become less than responsive to due to seeing so much of it (viz. the frog in the boiling water…)

  • katie
    October 30, 2009 Reply

    A big thank you from London, Abp Dolan, for writing so forthrightly.

  • Mona Lisa Biberstein
    October 30, 2009 Reply

    Please continue to share your insights. It is sometimes easy to fall prey to the “media blitz against Catholics and Catholiscism” when that’s all we hear/see. Hearing the truth so succintly does one good. I love my faith and my rights to exercise that faith so I appreciate all that you are doing to protect it. God bless you

  • Steve Parode
    October 30, 2009 Reply

    Your Excellency, Thank you for your candid evaluation of only a portion of the uninformed forces arrayed against our faith. As a former Protestant, I can confirm that while our Mother Church is perceived to be a worthy target for hate speech cloaked in the guise of free press, the fact that a majority of Americans profess faith in our Lord Jesus Christ provides any minority the supposed authority to victimise all Christians. I take heart from your words and have steeled my faith. I believe that our Lord has by example called us to welcome victimhood and relish it in a way that non-believers could never understand nor accept. I believe that here in the United States, we will always have the opportunity to answer that call.

  • Al Ochoa
    October 30, 2009 Reply

    It’s a hard article, but the truth is always hard… thanks!!!

  • Dennis Shaw
    October 30, 2009 Reply

    I am a Roman Catholic priest. The prejudice of the church against women is as obvious as it is shameful. Maybe we could just have an “open-transfer” in both directions between the Anglican and Roman churches. Throw in a starting pitcher and it should be a deal! Peace, Fr. Dennis

  • Robert
    October 30, 2009 Reply

    With all due respect sir, I must offer the perspective of the other side. Everyone else on here appears to be congratulating you plenty, so I will be “that guy” who no one can stand. (I am a Yankees fan myself, if that alleviates the rage any. . .)Your words imply that some Americans just sit around all day and dream up ways to hate Catholics. While there may indeed be some who are this way, I believe they are a tremendous minority. There is no “nativist” position anymore I’m afraid, although I know the idea makes a good foil for your argument. I think most people don’t even know what exactly you are referring to. Instead, there is a weariness that arises in the hearts of many Americans when they hear the RCC once again decrying the actions of our government or taking steps to vehemently oppose its actions. I have elsewhere characterized the Vatican as the world’s greatest “armchair quarterback.” As I wrote on my blog The Vatican Lobby, the Roman Catholic Church excells in kicking countries while they are down. “With none of the responsibilities of actually regulating an economy or maintaining a population or solving the day to day problems of running a real nation, Rome feels quite comfortable telling others how to do so. It condemns this one, and rebukes that one, and all the while reserves for itself the identity of a ‘perfect society.'” This self-righteous position is, without question, quite repugnant to egalitarian Americans. Especially when these same Americans are aware of the church’s notoriously checkered past (i.e., some of those things that Dowd mentions in her article). Therefore, the impression of a church that ceaselessly condemns everyone around it, and displays the same kind of xenophobic anger that you assign to so-called “anti-Catholics,” causes a great deal of animosity in the street. Not all Americans, as you know, are believers in God. The fact that you ceaselessly take the pharisaic position of “Thank God I’m not like that guy over there” is not drawing them any closer. It is, naturally enough, going to evoke a reaction. It is as simple as that.The Vatican exerts an immense influence in this country, and more often than not this influence is utilized to implement policy that is pro-Vatican, and not necessarily pro-American. Those people who voice opposition to the church are not expressing, in my opinion, some latent hatred for the doctrines of Catholicism, or for individual Catholics for that matter. They are instead reacting to the presence of an outspoken foreign power that seeks to advance its own agenda inside this country without concern for how this agenda supports or undermines the integrity of this country. And they are made sick by the thought of an entity that walks with a giant timber sticking out of its eye unendingly pointing out the specks to be found in everyone else’s.Anyway, those are my thoughts. I agree with the Catholic Church on many issues, abortion being one of them. However, I do not feel that the church spreads its message in the right way. The Vatican’s aggressive political stance and geopolitical maneuvering is certainly not in harmony with the behavior of Jesus Christ or the apostles for that matter. The kingdom of God is, as we know, not of this world.Thank you for listening. Go Yankees.

  • patrick dolan
    October 30, 2009 Reply

    Saint Jerome wrote how difficult it is for a man or woman to achieve perfection. These moderns are never happy. They discard supernatural knowledge from the sciences and then try to perform biological miracles along with hazardous experiments concerning “light” as if the latter experiments could illumne their private darkness. Crackpots all!

  • Randy Kizewski
    October 30, 2009 Reply

    We miss you in Milwaukee so much. You are the truth from our Lord. Everytime I read an article written by you, or hear one of your talks, I thank God for sending you to us. Please keep up your mission. And also Please remember the Brewers in your prayers next year…… LOL

  • Fr. Orlowski
    October 30, 2009 Reply

    Robert’s view from the other side is typical of the discrimination against the Catholic church. In response to anything Catholic they simply roll out a litany out unfair attacks. He is doing exactly what the Archbishop was speaking against: giving the church unfair treatment. People are not just sitting around inventing ways to attack the church, but when the opportunity arises they do it with impunity and without thought of being reasonable. Because they are cheered on and hardly checked in the least they flatter themselves and think themselves competent to say something intelligent about the church. The Catholic church has little to do with the modern world. You have to really hunt for news on it let alone an advocate of the church. So it is interesting that Robert people would be be so harsh against it unless at sometime it really annoyed them that the church had almost a billion adherents through out the whole world. I think more respect has to be show to the billion adherents, because if only because they are a minority in this secular world. We have to continually call these people on their ad hominum attacks against the church are not Catholics allowed express their faith. Why is it that people can put up ghouls and monsters on Halloween but manger scenes are not allowed? Because of knee jerk discrimination. We are told that we have to tolerate evil, but religion cannot be tolerated. Another sign of knee jerk discrimination that is so pervasive in our society. Thank Your Grace!

  • Joe Schmo
    October 30, 2009 Reply

    Archbishop Dolan is a stand up guy and bishop. I’m glad you wrote this!!

  • Joe Schmo
    October 30, 2009 Reply

    Archbishop Dolan is a stand up guy and bishop. I’m glad you wrote this!!

  • Jay Maurer
    October 30, 2009 Reply

    As usual, His Excellency stepped up to the plate and hit this one right out of the park !

  • Gabe
    October 30, 2009 Reply

    What a shame that Dolan feels he has to defend his church. I believe it was said of the early church by the Romans that if it is of God it will survive, and if it is not, it will die. The decline in catholics in the USA shows that what the church has become is NOT of God. I would follow Derek Jeter farther than I would follow Benedict! Americans have not become anti-catholic, they’ve just become sick of hearing about the rape of innocent children and vulnerable adults, the cover-up and outright lies by the hierarchy, investigations of religious women that result in secret reports, and the desperation for priests that forces the hierarchy to steal them from another denomination instead of examine the reason for the decline in their own. The church has not progressed out of the Dark Ages – the United States has.

  • Steph
    October 30, 2009 Reply

    Thankyou so much Archbishop Dolan. You speak the truth and God knows New York needs you. I love New York but it is what it is including greed, because of the majority who rules which has added to the Godlessness as well as the discrimination and slander towards any Christian whether it be Roman Catholic or Protestant. The NYC Bd of Ed has proven itself many times to be a hell hole and without funds for private schools eventually the entire next generation will be intellecutally, mentally and spiritually dead in more ways than one. But the good news is this is all temporary and what is eternal is what matters. And in the end God is going to deal with all those who have sinned for He knows the secrets of the heart and who are His. Its never easy to love the sinner, but as we know Jesus loves the sinner but not the sin. And we have to continue to remain with discerning spirits knowing what is of God and not of God. All churches have had their problems and the tradition of Christianity goes deeper than we will ever understand especially as we find more new found writings. The tradition of the church is deeper than what those who do not understand. And of course I believe all forms of sin, sexual perversion are sinful and realize all those no matter what their beliefs are, remain in spiritual darkness damned to hell separated from God. The Bible is our road map in life and through our acceptance of the truth of God, we know what is of God and not of God. All we can do is surrender to Jesus and continue to live according to God’s word and will and pray hard. “Enter through the narrow gate. For wide is the gate and broad is the road that leads to destruction, and many enter through it. But small is the gate and narrow the road that leads to life, and only a few find it.” Matt 7:13

  • Danny Buentello
    October 30, 2009 Reply

    Bless you Archbishop. I so tired of the mother church taking all the bullets for, not only Christianity, but for organized religion as well..

  • Erasmus
    October 30, 2009 Reply

    Okay – I’ve read all the posts up to this moment in time and I smell a rat. There are no less than 68 ‘pro’ Dolan posts, 7 moderate or non-comittal posts, and 10 opposite opinion posts. To use the tiresome baseball analogy, strike one for Tim with respect to opening up any kind of legitimate dialogue with those who might disagree with him. Not good. Sad, actually. Possibly one reason the anti-Catholic message finds so many willing listeners – because the church won’t listen or rigs it so it seems the amount of disagreement is less than it is. This blog is edited, to be sure, so it’s possible my post won’t see the light of day, but I accept that. It means enough to me to be able to speak, which the hierarchy of the church frowns upon. I think the church is afraid. It knows it is wrong on so many fronts, and with it losing its greatest thinkers in the last half century, shies away from debate or open converstions of any kind. The history of our church beggars many more questions than it answers, while also exposing those decisions of church officals in the past to closer scrutiny, which in turn reveals less than credible results as to why we did what we did, or do what we do, all without responsibility to the faithful. This frustrates its congregants, who try to reconcile the universal Love of Christ with the discriminatory practices of His church. The church makes gay men and women feel, well, unloved. Devout and pius women are denied access to consecration for poor reasons, leaving many of those they serve without the body of Christ. Married men drawn to that same vocation are equally denied it. The church preaches, ‘come close but go no further’, while the Christ it claims to represent was accessible to any and all. These exceptions to church rule may seem to many of the faithful as an annoying and persistent rant fomented by the progressives or liberal elites, but the fact is they never, ever, go away, and if they were indeed felt and espoused by only a select few of dissidents with little in the way of intellectual defense they would die the way of any fad – but they don’t. Pope John the twenty-third knew this was coming – he foresaw it and tried to preempt it, but his death and the political and economic strengths of others insured his efforts would fail, at least in part. Maybe it’s time again. Maybe the church doors need to be opened wide and the dust and detritus of the Roman Catholic Church be swept out to make room for the fresh air of tolerance, compassion, humility accessibility and reason, all in the name of Jesus Christ and not in the name of Peter. Or maybe not. Whether this post sees light will determine that answer. [this would make me number 11]

  • It’s Me Ty
    October 30, 2009 Reply

    What a good article. As always, you speak the truth, Archbishop Dolan. We miss you so much in Milwaukee. We are sheepies without our shepherd.

  • amjustsayin
    October 30, 2009 Reply

    a nurse would never attempt to perform a doctors duties. the Catholic church has their roles very well defined. IT IS A CHURCH. can’t understand why so many try to change the principles of the Catholic Church. nuns assisting young girls to have abortions; in the Catholic church is not a good deed. not a good thing at all. sorry. that will never change. there are thousands of good nuns but a few are not so good… cant’ believe the Pope is criticized for investigating… THAT’S HIS JOB! To Priest above “The prejudice of the church against women is as obvious as it is shameful” shame on you for allowing it. it doesn’t happen in my church. we respect and appreciate our nuns…

  • Peter Brennan
    October 30, 2009 Reply

    Your Excellency, if the Mokba Times refuse to publish your article it’s kind of a moral affirmation of its veracity. Maybe the Washington Post will pick it up. Give that venue a shot.

  • steve dzida
    October 30, 2009 Reply

    While it is clearly true that sexual abuse of minors has occurred in other churches, in the public schools, in the Boy Scouts, etc., there is one EXTREMELY important difference between these other institutions and groups and our Catholic Church. The response to abuse allegations by the Catholic leadership involved coverups, intimidation, transfers of abusers without warnings, etc., all of which conduct showed little or no respect for victims and, at the same time, exposed other innocents to danger. Such misconduct by leaders in the other churches and institutions listed above seems not to have occurred or, at least, not to the degree and in the systematic, Church-wide way that we have discovered in our Catholic Church. I am confident that the bright light the press has been shining on our Church over this tragic and shameful scandal will continue until our leadership accepts the fact that, as guilty as the abusers have been, our leaders are just as guilty, if not more so, for their shameful (and often arrogant) misconduct in abetting these crimes.

  • Stella Marie Jeffrey
    October 30, 2009 Reply

    You are another great blessing to our Church – (not unlike our own Bishop Aquila)! Praise God for your leadership!

  • Rick DeLano
    October 30, 2009 Reply

    BRAVO ARCHBISHOP DOLAN! Man, it feels good to have a Bishop who the New York Times fears so much they won’t even print his letter. HOME RUN, ARCHBISHOP DOLAN!!!!

  • Texas Cousin Michael
    October 30, 2009 Reply

    Might I suggest the Archbishop do a little snooping around to find out just how many of his flock subscribe to the NYT. Out of the 2.5 million Catholics, I would suggest there would be a fair amount of them that would be willing to “go to bat” for the Church and allow their subscriptions to “lapse”. If all the parishes and their lay and religious leaders utilize the Sunday “announcements” time from the church pulpits to throw a high, hard one the paper’s way, ala Bob Gibson, I’d be willing to bet you a dinner at Bartolino’s that the “lapse” in business the Times will experience, will make them back away from the “plate”, and reassess their “stance”. God bless you Tim.

  • peter
    October 30, 2009 Reply

    Archbishop we could use you over here in Queens, helping the Mets… …we’ll give you a life-time contract, until you get the “Shoes of the Fishermen!”

  • Graham Combs
    October 30, 2009 Reply

    I lived in New York in the 80s and 90s and, although not a Catholic at that time, was appalled by comments about Archbishop O’Connor and even Pope John Paul II. Feminists and leftists that I knew in publishing and academia were often reduced to adolescent facial expressions and gutteral noises in their response to these two holy men. Remember — in that time of the AIDS epidemic, it was Cardinal O’Connor who not only opened up Church hospitals to gay men sick and dying with AIDs, but also visited the wards weekly to help nurses and aids in their care for them. As for the treatment of women and the LCWR — their beliefs and actions are indistinguishable from the worst abuses in the Episcopal Church of which I am a former member. Unrecognizable as Christians, they commit fraud and scandal in the Church and are themselves anti-Catholic. It is, as Mother Angelica has said, about power, not change… The “prophetic tradition” that liberals claim is merely a reliquary of discredited ideas that recycle every century or so in England, France, Germany, Russia, and now in America. And mostly out of boredom and egotism and that lowest form of intellectualism — sophistication.

  • Andrew Piacente
    October 30, 2009 Reply

    Finally, finally, finally. a bishop with the courage of an apostle. Finally. The bigotry of the NYT is finally being exposed. Thank you Bishop Dolan – Thank you. Andy Piacente aka Doria2

  • Mary Cullinan
    October 30, 2009 Reply

    Thank you Archbishop Dolan for your “on the mark” description of anti-Catholic bias in the media. Your strong and courageous voice of truth and reason is an inspiration and blessing. I pray that other Bishops will be inspired to follow your example and speak the truth we so desperately need to hear. May God bless you.

  • Manuel G. Daugherty Razetto
    October 30, 2009 Reply

    Your Grace: I applaud your sincerity and courage to defend our Mother Church. The prevalent timidity among our Episcopate to stand up against those who wrongly attack our Church is discouraging. New York has an Archbishop with a spine ! May God Bless you. Manuel, in Tucson.

  • Lorenzo-NY
    October 30, 2009 Reply

    We’re tired of this tired rhetoric, Archbishop. The Church deserves the oprobrium from the media. Thank God ( literally ) for our free press. If not for the media, and especially the Boston Globe and their diligent spotlight on the Cardinal Law scandal, we would still be hiding the truth. You’ve made a nice debut, Your Grace, now try a different approach. How about candor?

  • Dr. Dan
    October 30, 2009 Reply

    We hated to see you go, but we’re happy you’re showing those easterners how the Faith is practiced in the Heartland

  • adele young
    October 30, 2009 Reply

    Surely this wonderfully out-spoken shephard has spoken for us all who have chaffed under the only acceptable prejudice left for those who continue to hate what they do not understand…Our Christ said it all when he warned us that as the world treated Him, the Author of Truth, so they would treat all who would follow Him in like manner. The New York Times failure to publish a letter from the Archbishop of New York represents an out-rageous and reprehensible act of insolence….which according to a bill just signed into law by our “transcendent” President could be perhaps characterized by definition a “hate crime”…definitely a gross act of injustice.

  • Sandra
    October 30, 2009 Reply

    I came to this site via WDTPRS (Thank-you Fr. Z). What an inspiring piece. Thank-you for writing and publishing it, and may Our Lord Bless you, and all priests and religious. Without pastors and teachers we would be so lost in this world.

  • Geegs
    October 31, 2009 Reply

    Frankly, this should be published verbatim in the times. A perfect way for this whining idiocy to reach a broader audience

  • laurazim
    October 31, 2009 Reply

    Fr. Dennis, sir, you may be a Roman Catholic priest; I am a Roman Catholic woman. I’m afraid I just don’t see any truth to your assertion that the Church harbors prejudices against women. Rather, She elevates the sacred vessels God has chosen to be the bearer of new souls into the world. In my home diocese, women are highly respected by our priests, and in no way feel unfulfilled or anything of the sort. Have you never read Alice VonHildebrand’s “The Privilege of Being A Woman”? I highly recommend it. Those of us women who embrace the fullness of the Church’s teachings joyfully participate in the lives of our parishes in the ways suitable to our vocations. If things are different where you are, then by all means, help to make them right. But please don’t think for one minute that allowing the ordination of women to the sacred priesthood is the way to go about it.

  • simon
    October 31, 2009 Reply

    I am Indian and am grateful for the warning

  • Tom Bowman
    October 31, 2009 Reply

    I am a big fan of Archbishop Dolan, he continues to lead others in faith whom will listen. In Glasgow and Scotland we have many of our religious leaders, leading from the front and taking a lot of abuse from Politicians, the media, television, journalists and so many others but they fight on. Bigotry and anti catholicism forces are just an accepted fact here, like night follows day for example: The Scottish Executive and the Uk government will not allow a Catholic to be a Prime Minister, Catholics may be seen but not heard, i could go on but i am sure the same attacks are happening worldwide. Anyway it is encouraging to be able to come onto the web and read from others sharing in our faith, God bless our Holy Father Pope Benedict 1v and all our Catholic Clergy worldwide, Tom from Glasgow, Scotland UK.

  • anne b.
    October 31, 2009 Reply

    Don’t you just love having a blog so that you can write whatever you want whenever you want? Who read the Times anymore? Newspapers are so yesterday! The blogs are where it’s at!

  • Hugh McLoughlin
    October 31, 2009 Reply

    I write from Scotland where I am a contributor to the Catholic press. Archbishop Dolan’s article could be borrowed by any member of the hierarchy here and submitted to any of our national newspapers, making appropriate local adjustments, and it would be bang on. Sadly, the same is true of any and all European countries, excepting one or two of the recently freed Eastern one. The Old World and the northern reaches of the New are awash with anti-Christianity particularly and especially of the Catholic variety. Orrabestorratime, Hughie

  • Paolo Gasparini
    October 31, 2009 Reply

    Let C.S.Lewis speak:”A merciful man aims at his neighbour’good as so does ‘God’s’ will…, a cruel man oppresses his neighbour…but in doing such evil he is used by God…so that the first man serves God as a son,and the second as a tool. For you will certainly carry out God’s purpose, however you act, but it makes a difference to you wether you serve like Judas or like John”.

  • Sr Maria
    October 31, 2009 Reply

    I was carefully taught to hate anything and anyone Catholic growing up protestant. This article is far from overstated. Since the NYTimes won’t print it, can’t another be found? Altho most likely that wouldn’t change anything, the point should be made over and over again.

  • Dan Hayes
    October 31, 2009 Reply

    Finally. Catholics have encouraged this bias by not reacting to it, while every objective criticism of Jews or Israel has gotten a strong reaction of “Anti Semitism”. The Times and the people who think like the Times are true believers in their prejudices so they never question them while congratulating themselves on their intelligence and right-thinking. We need to keep pointing this out with the same tone the Archbishop uses here.

  • Vladimir Lenin
    October 31, 2009 Reply

    Please, the self pity is not befitting your office. You have brought this all upon yourself. When are you going to stop pointing fingers at everyone else and accept responsibility for your behavior and criminal activity.

  • George Welborn
    October 31, 2009 Reply

    Mr. Archbishop Dolan, You fail to realize that anti-Catholicism is based on Doctrine not simple naive prejudice. Evangelical reject the Ministerial Priesthood, Sacraments, Marian Dogma, forged Decretals, Papacy, Transubstantiation, Infant Baptism, as being inventions of the Middle Ages. Even Cardinal Newman admits that Catholics liberally adopted pagan practices into the church. Thus it is my Christian duty to tell the Catholic church to repent and get rid of her pagan practices for they are an affront to a Holy God. Christianity + Paganism = Catholicism Judaism + Paganism = Samaritan religion Christianity = Evangelical Protestantism Muslim god = Catholic god = False god Christian God = Evangelical Protestant God

  • Marge Fenelon
    October 31, 2009 Reply

    Archbishop Dolan, thank you. When our bishops have the courage to stand strong so, too, will the people in the pews. With continued prayers for you…

  • Paul
    October 31, 2009 Reply

    Thank you, Archbishop Dolan for such an articulate and accurate portrayal of the very real presence of anti-Catholicism in the U.S. It is indeed the last acceptable prejudice, perhaps because most people do not wish to know or hear the Truth.

  • Mary Ellis
    October 31, 2009 Reply

    More important than Archbishop Dolan’s comments themselves are the fact that they have been posted on this blog,and free commentary has been allowed (I presume, since so many are negative). Kudos for allowing the discussion and not censoring it. Too bad none of the folks sneering at the Archbishop over at the Commonweal blog – Notre Dame law professor Cathleen Kaveny, among them – have the courage to come over here and address the archbishop directly.

  • Louis Lucente
    October 31, 2009 Reply

    Right on. As a reply we should double our efforts to live the Gospel and let God take care of things.!!!!

  • Philip Andrews
    October 31, 2009 Reply

    Great article, Your Grace! I hope you might grace us with a visit to London in the not too distant future. Your infectious enthusiasm for the Faith is wonderful! God bless you.

  • Don
    October 31, 2009 Reply

    Congratulations to Ms. Dowd for triggering Archbishop Dolan’s whimper. The truth is difficult for Dolan to hear, seeing how he has been educated on what to think, not how. It is true that the Inquisition, Holocaust, lies about condoms, obsession with sex, pedophile priests, and perennial oppression of women do not make for good press about Vatican values, so Dolan blames it all on anticatholicism. We cradle catholics are grateful for Maureen Dowd’s catholic perspective. It is Dolan’s perspective that strikes us as anticatholic. DL

  • Robert Schutzius, Sec. ARCC
    October 31, 2009 Reply

    In spite of Archbishop Dolan accusation of bias against the Catholic church by the media, he must acknowledge that the events described are real events and deserving of criticism. 1. He points out the exaggerated coverage of “Catholic” clergy sexual abuse, when other denominations have the same problem. But it IS a real CATHOLIC PROBLEM 2. He cites the extraordinary focus given to the Franciscan priest who advised his lover to seek and abortion and fathered a son who is now suffering from cancer. But it is a REAL CATHOLIC FOSTERED SITUATION. 3. He bemoans the strong reaction to the Vatican’s investigation of certain groups of US religious women, but it is well know that a Vatican inquiry usually spells “INQUISITION” in reality and in the minds of Catholics. 4. He especially cites the N.Y. Times and the entertainment media of ” intemperate and scurrilous” attacks and he may be right by their degree of focus, BUT NOT BE THEIR FACTS. So the Archbishop feels hurt by the rough way the Church is being treated by the media’s presentation of the facts If they were not about factual misdeeds, secrecy, and cover-up, he might have a right to complain, but telling us about his feelings, especially coming from a nice guy and down-to-earth, bingo bishop, just does not deserve our sympathy. __._,_.___

  • Jay Maurer
    October 31, 2009 Reply

    As usual, His Excellency stepped up to the plate and hit this one right out of the park !

  • Barb Finnegan
    October 31, 2009 Reply

    Greetngs from Upstate New York [Syracuse Diocese]! Thank you, Archbishop, for letting the New York Times ‘have it’! I, for one, am tired of the mass media bashing Catholics, especially our priests! And, as the poster before me states, the Times would not print what you wrote…’all the news that’s fit to print’…HA! But then, Our Lord never said that those who follow Him will have it easy in this life: ‘If the world hates you, know that it has hated Me before you.’ Thank you for standing up for the Faith-for Truth! Oh-and GO YANKEES!

  • Russell Kendall
    October 31, 2009 Reply

    Your Excellancy,Thank you for taking a stand against the Times and its Biased articles,As a Grand Knight of the Joseph Gorman Council#5091,Syosset our organization knows what biased is and was and it never goes away, all that can be said is the fact a lot of people are jealous knowing that we are strong in our faith and love our GOD & Church and our Preists

  • Fr. John Palatucci
    October 31, 2009 Reply

    The real issue more than anything else is abortion and homosexual marriage. Since we are the voice of an age against these issues we are in the sights of everyone who supports them. But that which doesn’t kill us only makes us stronger. As our Gospel of All Saints Day tells us, “Blessed are you when they insult you and persecute you and utter every kind of evil against you falsely because of me. Rejoice and be glad, for your reward will be great in heaven.” This is the stuff that saints are made from! My only regret is that you didn’t take out a full page ad in the Post and the News with a similar letter to the kind of post written here. And how good would it be if all Catholics in this great Archdiocese decided to no longer subscribe or buy the NY Times. I wish us Catholics woud stand up and stick together a bit more. You just may end up being another Abp. “Dagger” John Hughes. Prayerfully yours.

  • Catholic Defender (Defenders of the Catholic Faith (DCF)
    October 31, 2009 Reply

    Robert, it is good for the Archbishop to respond to some of these glaring attacks on the Catholic Faith. The Catholic Faith is a Kingdom, the Vatican is the Lord’s royal embassy from heaven. There are many of us who love the Lord and follow Him within His Kingdom. This will be a contrast to the secular world, it was in Nero’s day and it still is in Obama’s day. The Kingdom of God will continue to march forward bringing the Gospel to every nation as we seek justice for all people. The Kingdom of God is in our midst, it is right here in every Catholic Parish. The Pope is the Lord’s Prime Minister, His Royal Stewart, His Vicar. Sometimes we may not be perfect, I certainly am not, but we must be faithful to His Great Commission. I personally have been in the Army for nearly 25 years. In that time, I have been graced to see many conversions to the Catholic Faith. This Kingdom of Christ is for all and the Church invites all to come to the knowledge of the truth. God bless you.

  • Donatella
    October 31, 2009 Reply

    I applaud the Archbishop’s articulate expression of the anti-Catholic bias in this country, and particularly in the media. As a woman, I also take issue with Fr. Dennis Shaw’s comment about the Church’s “shameful” treatment of women. Please…every involved Catholic knows that women are the backbone of every parish. What would pastors do without their generous and self-less service? But none that I know what to become priests. We simply love the Church and want to serve her, using our unique gifts to build up the Body of Christ. I also reject the very poor witness of feminist, dissenting nuns (and the priests who support them) who are disobedient to the Church’s teaching on women’s ordination. I view that as a “shameful” waste of time and quite self-serving.

  • Thomas F. Schraad
    October 31, 2009 Reply

    Thank you Archbishop Dolan for your excellent article. Continue your service in sending out these articles. It is welcome that we have “some” Bishops that have stood up for our faith and teachings. Let us hope that all the Catholic Bishops listen to the request of the USCCB in responding to their concern about the current health care reform bill that is very anti Catholic.

  • Jay
    October 31, 2009 Reply

    Archbishop Dolans timing could not have been better in pointing out the “free pass” that everyone gets in bashing Catholics and in this case all Christians and their faith. Witness HBO’s “Curb Your Enthusiasm” show with Larry David. Fox News showed scenes from a recent episode where David “accidentally” urinates on a picture of Christ and a big “joke” ensues lampooning miracles, believers,etc..It is disturbing to think that this is what some in America consider amusing and entertaining. Naturally, the outrage has been muted and selective and the double standard is frighteningly obvious. Imagine the outcry had the butt or “victim” of the joke of this episode had been someone who is hnored or revered from most any any other culture, religion, ethic group, etc.. (lets see – how about a Jew, Muslim, African American, Homosexual, Lesbian, the list goes on…). You know the reaction if any these groups were offended it would be swift and serious – Heads would roll. In most cases figuratively, in one case perhaps – literally. However, since it’s “only” Christ – Hollywood and the “Entertainment” world consider that fair game. Anyone who has HBO should call them, cancel it and tell them why.

  • Ann
    October 31, 2009 Reply

    Thanks, Archbishop. I find the endless attacks on the Church very dispiriting. Thank you for defending it. More people should! I do think there is huge anti Catholic prejudice and a banal conformity to it. I see it a lot here in Maine, because of the gay marriage debate. Perhaps the Church has made mistakes–and still does–but what about he goodness and beauty I see all around me at Mass? I don’t see evil, I see the most humble made lovely. In all the vitriol directed toward the Church, the thing I find so odd is how the Living Reality (of which Czeslaw Milosz wrote so eloquently) is obscured.For disaffected ex-Catholics like Dowd–how did she miss the whole point? I comfort myself knowing these are temporal issues. But I’m also sick of being passive and now speak up more frequently when Catholicism is attacked.

  • Fr. Chip Hines
    October 31, 2009 Reply

    Your Excellency, Thank you for this wonderful blog entry. I, and others, have been saying this for years. Living in Boston we have had to put up with it for a long time now and it doesn’t seem to be getting any better. God Bless you for speaking out and for starting this blog. I think it will be appointment reading. Fr. Chip, Boston

  • Donatella
    October 31, 2009 Reply

    I applaud the Archbishop’s articulate expression of the anti-Catholic bias in this country, and particularly in the media. As a woman, I also take issue with Fr. Dennis Shaw’s comment about the Church’s “shameful” treatment of women. Please…every involved Catholic knows that women are the backbone of every parish. What would pastors do without their generous and self-less service? But none that I know what to become priests. We simply love the Church and want to serve her, using our unique gifts to build up the Body of Christ. I also reject the very poor witness of feminist, dissenting nuns (and the priests who support them) who are disobedient to the Church’s teaching on women’s ordination. I view that as a “shameful” waste of time and quite self-serving.

  • Lorenzo-NY
    October 31, 2009 Reply

    Keep drinking the koolaid, folks! Blame it all on the media. Just be grateful we live in a country with freedom of the press. If not for the media many more children would be at risk in the Catholic Church, we’d still be covering it up and those much touted ” child protection policies” would be in the mind and heart of God. Timothy Dolan is a a welcome change in NY, but not when he croons the same old tune of anti catholic bias. Many of us, obviously not on this site, are tired of it. And we’re tired of the Church continually giving the press more grist for its mill. The NY press for all its bravado and self importance is a paper tiger. The Boston Globe is the real hero in this priest scandal saga. Their spotlight brought down Bernard Law. The Times is too sanctimonious to plumb the depths of the NY Archdiocese and its horrors, The Daily News is more interested in clever heradlines and the Post is pure pablum.

  • Martin Blackshaw
    October 31, 2009 Reply

    Your Grace, Congratulations from Scotland, UK, on a letter well overdue. Anti-Catholicism in the press and media, however, is not restricted to the United States. Indeed, it is particularly virile in Britain and, to a slightly lesser degree, in the other nations of Europe. I regret that Your Grace is only one of a few prelates today who see it as their Catholic duty to take a stand against this growing hostility toward the Church (and make no mistake that this is a determined conspiracy against the Holy Catholic Religion and its Divine Founder). There was a time, not so long ago, when the Holy See would have declared, as you have, against these bigots. It was a time when the Popes spoke and the world listened attentively. Sadly, the modernists condemned by St. Pius X wheeled a big Trojan Horse up to the gates of the City of God (the Church) at Vatican II and changed all that. The result is that today the Church militant is now hardly visible, obscured by the smoke of liberalism or, more precisely, to quote Pope Paul VI, “The smoke of Satan.” This is the insidious belief that the Church can and must be reconciled to the world when, in fact, the very opposite is true. The result of this catastrophic error of judgment has been the emptying of God from our churches, the emptying of seminaries and religious orders, public dissent from Church teaching on the part of so-called Catholic politicians and the most disgraceful dissent on the part of even prelates and priests in matters pertaining to both faith and morals. Little did any of us suspect that when Pope John XXIII threw open the windows of the Church “to let in some fresh air,” a hurricane would enter and devastate the House of God. In other words, the Church became saturated with the spirit of the world, which stands in opposition to God and all things supernatural. Is it any great surprise, then, that in a weakened state, much like Our Lord during His passion, walking towards Calvary, His enemies and detractors move in for the kill on His Mystical Body? We must expect things to get much worse before they improve. The gates of Hell will not prevail! In the meantime, here is the tragic irony of present crisis. This vicious campaign of lies and misinformation on the part of the press and media against the Catholic Church, which Your Grace rightly complains about, is not dissimilar to the anti-SSPX rhetoric so often written, without leave to challenge, in publications bearing the name ‘Catholic.’ It is also a campaign scandalously adhered to by many of Your Graces’ own confreres. Sensationalist terms such as “excommunicated,” “schismatic,” “not in communion with the Holy See,” “rebels,” “extremists,” “Lefevrists,” “disobedient” and other such inflamatory adjectives are all too frequently applied to the SSPX as an institution, and in as equally hateful a manner as the aforementioned secular press and media outlets. Perhaps, Your Grace, there is some serious food for thought in this irony. If those within the Church who make such scurrilous statements, and who even refuse to implement Summorum Pontificum can have a free hand without fear of censure, then we can’t really expect the anti-Catholic press and media to be fearful of joining the band wagon and moving in for the kill. I see many similarities between Our Lord’s historical passion and the present passion of His Mystical Body, yes even down to the part played by Judas Iscariot. Thanks be to God that some prelates, Your Grace included, are still prepared to stand by Him in public without fear and human respect. God bless, guide and strengthen His Holiness Pope Benedict XVI in these difficult and unprecedented times. Soon after his election to the Papacy, he was overheard to say to some prelates: “pray for me that I do not run from the wolves.” I think many of us understand precisely what His Holiness meant by these words. In the Immaculate Heart of Mary Martin Blackshaw

  • The Rev. Dr. Christopher Brown
    October 31, 2009 Reply

    I am not a Roman Catholic, but rather an Episcopal priest who is not happy with the direction taken by my own church in recent years. I too was appalled by Maureen Dowd’s article. It seems to me that those who have been raised Roman Catholic but have embraced an entirely secular outlook feel that they have a special right invoke the entire catalogue of anti-catholic stereotypes against the church in which they were raised. I am sorry, it is unfortunate.

  • Confirmation Name Paul
    November 1, 2009 Reply

    I’m a cradle Catholic. And I recognize and admire the Catholic Church for feeding the hungry and caring for the poor and the sick. It is God’s hand at work for sure. Sexual abuse of children is a reprehensible reality of human nature. This sick perversion occurs in all societies. And I don’t blame the Catholic Church for a few bad priests. But I can’t get past the Church knowingly allowing these priests to stay in a position of authority where they could continue to destroy the lives of children. Paul would have been furious. And Christ would not have done that. Why did the Church?

  • Mary Elizabeth
    November 1, 2009 Reply

    Thanks Archbishop Dolan for your piece. I don’t get the NYT and have never read it.I’m glad to read this on your blog.I am grateful and happy to be a member of the Catholic Church militant. I know that grace is the reason for that. I expect the slings and arrows of those who hate the Church or are just hurt, but I appreciate a good solid Catholic Bishop’s voice calling out for fairness in the media. God knows we could use more of that. For those issuing their comments here who have been hurt in various ways by the Church or her members, clergy and laity alike, I pray that you will reach out to the God who loves us all and find a way to forgive. This is where your peace and strength will be found. We in the Church have the gift of the Sacrament of Reconciliation. How blessed it is to receive mercy, and then to give mercy to those who have harmed us. In this world I don’t see any other way to live out each day.

  • Fr. Tim Moyle
    November 1, 2009 Reply

    Your Grace, I join my voice to those who thank you for joining in the defense of the faith in the virtual world. I have been posting on my blog asking for your Canadian brothers to do the same. Even though I appreciate that this might be self-serving on my part, I would invite the readers of your post to visit my efforts and join in the fight. I would particularly ask people to read my open letter which was sent to every Bishop in Canada, and if they share in the same opinion to take steps to encourage their Shepherds to join you in making the argument for the faith instead of leaving the virtual field to the opponents of the church. Thank you for your work, and as well to any who might accept my invitation. Sincerely, Fr. Tim Moyle St. Anne’s Parish Diocese of Pembroke, Canada

  • Warren Anderson
    November 1, 2009 Reply

    Thank you Archbishop Dolan for your strong witness to the truth. Sadly, so many (too many!) journalists have forgotten or ignored their dignity. Without a free press, democracy would not, could not be. The loss of dignity among journalists and media organizations is, in my opinion, due to a selling of the news and thus a selling of their souls. Sex sells! Violence sells! Conspiracy sells! Too few journalists are interested in the truth. Typically, the most influential journalism schools preach a rejection of the idea that it is possible to communicate truth in an unbiased manner. In a world of seven second sound bites gossip and cheap shots make for a quick sell to consumers who, conditioned by a press that amounts to a cadre of white collared drug dealers – the drug being half-truth, would rather imbibe information that merely reinforces smugness and entitlement in modern man. The Times has slipped a long way from the day when it defied the anti-catholicism of the day to report on Pope Pius XII (editorial on December 25, 1942 – late Day edition, p. 16). Now, however, conformed to a fashionable bigotry, the Times can be counted on no more than the National Enquirer to present factual information.

  • Mary Miller
    November 1, 2009 Reply

    To all who try to keep the idea alive of knowing that God guides all who truly believe. Abuser of any religion, community, or time and place are not believers, just pretenders. “Those who can see the invisible, can accomplish the impossible.” Catholics don’t speak the way, the truth, and the light often enough, publicly. Pray! Mary

  • Antoinette Carbone
    November 1, 2009 Reply

    The sad thing is that Catholics do not fight back. Your essay should be published in every Catholic newspaper in the country. After all the NY Times is out there nationally. I for one often think of cancelling my subscription to that paper which is now engaging in discriminating print.

  • Anthony Aarts
    November 1, 2009 Reply

    Here Here your Excellency!

  • RD
    November 2, 2009 Reply

    when did that paper become a “major” newspaper? Was it the times that said in 1965 that God was dead in a headline? remember they print the paper with the cheapest ink and on the cheapest paper…bottom line profit, profit, profit…I did enjoy his writing.

  • Casey Truelove
    November 2, 2009 Reply

    Well said, Your Excellency! Thank you for your boldness!

  • Mark Jones
    November 2, 2009 Reply

    My heart breaks when I think of the pain and terror the innocent children raped by our priests (and the priests of all denominations) endured. As Christians we should not attempt to silence the few voices that speak out for our victims. I am so very ashamed of my Church.

  • Lavinia Tai
    November 2, 2009 Reply

    We have politicians who leap from one party to another for their own selfish purposes and now even priests are taking part in this kind of opera show. Are the Catholics really fishing in the Anglican pond or are the fishes in the Anglican pond leaping into the Catholic pond because the pasture here is greener? No tensions or power struggle. Celibate priests are not interested in materialism and they don’t have to ensure that their children are offered a high position in the church. That’s why there is no struggle for power and no tensions. I don’t understand why our Catholic Church is constantly being attacked when it is the most genuine Church in the world. Our celibate priests are a true reflection of the life of Christ (with the exception of some black sheep which is inevitable as there are black sheep everywhere). Why don’t those people who attack the Catholic Church first look at their own churches. Are their pastors living the life of Christ? Married men are concerned with material things and they always put their family before the church. A friend of mine told me that her pastor is exceptionally nice to people who always buy presents for his son and wife. Why isn’t anyone complaning how materialistic the pastors are? My firend brought me to her church a few times but I just couldn’t feel the presence of Christ in this pastor. I just couldn’t concentrate on what he preached because he isn’t living the life of Christ. That’s why I will never leave the Catholic Church. It is in the Catholic Church that I can really experience the presence of Christ through our priests who live the life of Christ. May the Catholic Church prevail!

  • Margaret Yo
    November 2, 2009 Reply

    Clearly, anti-catholic hate speech needs to be confronted, and all who do so in a rational, balanced way is to be applauded. I am grateful for Archbishop Dolan’s contribution in this. However, truth-speech must not be lumped in with or buried in what is considered anti-catholic hate-speech. Children not protected from pedophile priests by a church hierarchy that did not live up to its moral obligation to do so is an issue that cries out for justice and believing so does not one an anti-catholic make. Ditto for women’s ‘place’ in the church. We know wrong when we see it, and saying what it is is the right thing to do.

  • Bronx
    November 2, 2009 Reply

    Did we read the same article? Or is the Archbishop from that school of thought that finds all criticism anti-Catholic? That way the substance of an argument can be ignored.

  • John Feretich
    November 2, 2009 Reply

    Archbishop Dolan: Excellent first step. Now lets get you and your intelligent and well thought out topic on the front pages of some major newspapers and TV News shows. Blogs are a beginning. We need a face once again and a voice once again in mainstream media speaking for Catholics. If we act like a minority we are preceived as one. Its not about who is number one. We are not concerned with such things. However we do need to be re-recognized as a corner stone on which the city was built and continues to thrive thanks to. Catholics from all over Europe were the salt of NYC. The pillars in the neighborhoods were our schools and churches. Now we are being fired at from the likes of Kennedys and Dowds??? We need to regain momentum. Archbishop Dolan – Please lead the way ….

  • K.M.R., Dallas TX
    November 2, 2009 Reply

    This article is wonderful, and long overdue. I hope that Catholics everywhere take the cue and stand up for their faith and dignity as rational, Christ loving people. The one thing that I would add is that, while Catholicism is often the object of discrimination and blind negativity, Christianity as a whole increasingly receives the same treatment by the media. I am disgusted at the things I hear and see from people who make fun of people for their faith in Christ – even on national TV – when attacking any other living religion in such a manner would be a public scandal. The secular world will always try to belittle people of faith and will continue to make light of what it cannot accommodate into its culture of materialism, sex and greed. I would urge all Christians, Catholic or otherwise, to stand together and loudly profess our faith in Christ, in word and in deed. That is the strongest statement we can make against this onslaught of prejudice. Thank you again for your article!

  • Matthew
    November 2, 2009 Reply

    An ordinary of the Church with resolve, brains and a PR sensitively and moxie that seems to be completely absent in his fellow bishops — at least here in the USA. Thanks ABp. Tim.

  • Barbara
    November 2, 2009 Reply

    I don’t expect you to read through all the comments, but from what I’ve heard of Bishop Dolan, he seems like a pretty nice guy.

  • Jeff Sobowski
    November 2, 2009 Reply

    Stop whining. There are thousands of burnt souls from clergy sexual abuse still laying beside the side of the road that you walk by that are bleeding. Stop and pick them up and your whining will turn to real tears.

  • Margaret Mary
    November 2, 2009 Reply

    In a way it is sad to see the decline of a paper that did at one time produce all the news fit to print.In lieu of news we get carefully selected articles whose bias is all too obvious or lately long essays from people who seem to seem to think their personal revelations are of interest. They are not. Actually I would include Ms. Dowd in this since she is clearly a very bitter lady. But I commend you for having a blog. People did feel sick about sexual abuse and in my parish our priests knew full well how we felt but in no way did it detract from their careful and caring stewardship of our spiritual lives.The Times is skidding toward oblivion and the very fact that your blog provides an enormous range of responses is a measure of how people have turned to the Internet to express opinions we basically only communicated to a few people. Welcome to New York by the way!

  • R. Hassett
    November 2, 2009 Reply

    A timely statement for all us to pay attention to. In the 1940’s the American Bishop’s produced a booklet “Nazi War Against the Catholic Church” on the progression of the anti Catholic agenda by the National Socialists under Hitler, which covered the media attack against the Clergy on sexual abuse charges and the wide spread disproportionate coverage given to the individual cases. It also included a sample of the persecutions of the Catholic Church clergy and laymen in many of the invaded Nations. This book was given to American Service men departing for the war in Europe. I hope today,s Bishops in the USA and Canada, both individually and collectively will not wait as long as Bishop Von Galen to lead the Catholic Church in asserting our Christian values and exercising our political aspirations, before we are subjected to similar persecutions tomorrow. History does repeat it self. May God continue to bless all your Holy Works.

  • caroline bardenhagen
    November 2, 2009 Reply

    You nailed it, Your Excellency! Thank you for sticking up for Holy Church. God Bless and Take Care.

  • az
    November 2, 2009 Reply

    Archbishop Dolan, thank you so much for standing up and being heard, well almost. I guess the spineless editors at the New York Times want to censure any thoughts different from their own. Regarding some of these posts, once again we hear the cries of sexual abuse and how ashamed many liberals and atheists are of the Catholic church because of those who prayed upon children, and rightfully so, we all are ashamed. But, it seems impossible for many liberals and atheists to have any discussion without immediately going to the subject of Priest molestation, condemning instead all Catholics and ignoring the issue at hand. Funny thing is, liberals and atheists never bring up the thousands of school teachers who have molested our children, or the Hollywood icons who have been caught with underage children-instead they champion them as people who just need help, or worse, call them “Kings of Pop.” Don’t blame Christianity and Catholicism for the awful mistakes of human beings…after all, just about every religion’s leaders and followers at one time or another have been responsible for some sort of atrocity or misdoing. To use some liberal’s and atheist’s logic, all teachers are horrible and evil, education should be wiped from the earth because so many teachers have been caught molesting or raping their students. Perhaps, however, if we just understood the 1000’s of lefty teachers that have molested their children, or the freakish Hollywood lefties who have raped or molested innocent boys and girls, if we just helped them and rehabilitated them, everything will be fine, right? I for one am proud to be a Catholic- some of you liberals and atheists need to find a new argument.

  • vinnie
    November 2, 2009 Reply

    Dolan ends up by talking about his background in American history. It is a shame he hasn’t studied the history of the Catholic Church. If he had, he would know that the church has a well documented fifteen hundred year history of priests sexually abusing children with the hierarchy covering it up. St. Peter Damian’s Letter 31, “The Book of Gomorrah,” written in the Eleventh Century deals exclusively with the rampant sexual abuse of children as well as the libertine habits of priests at the time. He lamented the failure of the hierarchy to take a stand. One would have to believe that if a church, that boasts some of the greatest minds of history, hasn’t figured out in over a millennium how to stop the sexual abuse of children by its priests than maybe they don’t want to and therefore deserve the derision they receive. Jesus said, “Take the log out of your own eye before you attempt to remove the splinter from your neighbors.” Since Dolan wants to cry FOUL, maybe he can explain his own foul in dealing with the victims. The good bishop recently visited Croton on Hudson which is the only parish in the country to have back to back pastors removed for the sexual abuse of children. Both pastors have been defrocked. The dioceses of Palm Beach had back to back bishops removed for sexual abuse, but Holy Name was the only parish where that happened to pastors. One would think that a man so concerned about his church would have extended an invitation to meet with the families of victims and seek redress while he was there dedicating a new altar. He made reference to the matter during his homily, but that was all he did. What a guy! The most amazing thing about this is the hypocrisy. The lesson bishop Dolan needs to learn is that he should drop the “they’re as bad as we are routine” and start striving to raise the bar instead of lowering it. If he wants his church to be a shining star, he should start by cleaning out the garbage. The day I pick up the NY Times and read that he has publicly criticized Cardinal Law for his actions and inactions in Boston or publicly criticized Cardinal Levada for his god-awful defense of bishop Ziemann, then maybe I will believe there is some sincerity.

  • B.Newman
    November 2, 2009 Reply

    Thank you Archbishop Dolan. I found your submitted letter to the Times very encouraging. We lay people are exposed to unfair and inaccurate slurs thrown at the Church (that is us)almost daily in the media and in our day to day experience with people.Sometimes it comes from disgruntled Catholics unfortunatley. The silence of the Bishops has been mostly deafening. A charge not answered is a charge that will not go away, but will become accepted conventional wisdom. Calling out anti-Catholicism will never make you popular with the Times but that may not be a bad thing. Please submit the letter to other media outlets and follow it up as frequently as possible when other examples of poor and blatant anti-Catholic reporting comes up. It is very encouraging to those of us who do try to defend the Church.

  • Doug Sirman
    November 3, 2009 Reply

    Hmmm, on the first bullet point, the good Archbishop is producing nothing but baked wind. He’s comparing one story about one year of one community of a city with the press-treatment of the proven behavior of the majority of bishops for the last 60 years, and he doesn’t even get that right. The article clearly states that there were 26 arrests this year, not the “forty cases of such abuse” that he claims. According to the story, there are 40 people willing to testify, which means the orthodox community is obviously not using the same legal teams as our sweet mother, The Church. Additionally, he implies the Times was behaving in a persecutory manner toward the church regarding a “tiny minority of priests.” This demonstrates that, Once Again, we have a Bishop willing to only tell a tiny, and conveniently self-serving fraction of the truth about the scandal by claiming it was about child-molesting priests and not the majority of Bishops who were willing to sacrifice an indefinite number of other people’s children as long as they didn’t have to do their damned jobs. Golly. I hope I have that kind of integrity someday. Now, to his credit, he doesn’t accuse the orthodox community of conducting an ongoing campaign of lies, willful obstruction of justice, or legally attacking victims to intimidate them, or using spiritual authority to silence them…but that would raise such uncomfortable questions about the Bishops long-standing behavior of giving only lip-service to justice while behaving like overzealous mafiosi, now wouldn’t it? Quelle Horror! We want to distance ourselves from those kinds of things as quickly as possible. The second bullet is iffy, and 3 and 4 are pretty much on his side. Why would he lead with the deception? I suppose he can claim he’s concerned with being “truthy” rather than “accurate” or “correct” or “honest” or “virtuous.” Then you read the disclaimer, in image form, on the right: “…The Archdiocese of New York is not responsible for the accuracy of any of the information supplied in the blog.” If questioned about anything he’s said or done, it sounds like Dolan’s going to be just like most other Bishops: he won’t be able to recall.

  • Alexander Richardson
    November 3, 2009 Reply

    Yes. it is time for Catholics to defend their faith from attack with the fierceness that other religions do. Why don’t we boycott and protest papers like the New York Times, or publishers of hate material like the Da Vinci Code that think they have a free ticket to abuse and lie about Catholicism? The only reason other religions are not attacked is the people who do it know they will face trouble and protest. They consider Catholicism a soft target, and will continue to “bully” until they are challenged. One result is the people who post here who believe some of the lies – that Catholicism is any worse than any other group with regard to abuse and the so-called “cover-up” ie in-house dealing with allegations. If lies aren’t strongly answered, people believe them

  • Theresa Garcia
    November 3, 2009 Reply

    Thank you so very much Archbishop Dolan for your defense of the Church against this latest attack. Hoping that more religious and faithful will speak out with a loud voice against these senseless and malicious utterings of an uneducated and vile nature.

  • Cindy Craig
    November 3, 2009 Reply

    Bravo, Archbishop Dolan! Those of us down in the “trenches” of living a Catholic life in a society pervaded with anti-Catholicism rejoice to have a leader who speaks out!

  • Ginger from California
    November 3, 2009 Reply

    God bless you Archbishop Dolan! Thank you for shining the light of truth on these blatant hit-and-run attacks perpetrated by the lazy, destructive media. Your flock (local & long distance) thanks God for your witness and much needed leadership. Count on our prayers from California!!

  • Scott Shanks
    November 3, 2009 Reply

    Keep up the good work, Bishop!!! New York is very fortunate to have you. As an Orthodox Anglican from Wisconsin, it’s refreshing to see Christianity defended so passionately.

  • DLT in DC
    November 3, 2009 Reply

    Thanks for taking your gloves off and speaking out against such inanity. Please don’t stop. You are in the prayers of the Catholic faithful.

  • Traditional Catholic
    November 3, 2009 Reply

    Archbishop, Thankyou for standing up for Catholics. Excellent point about the Orthodox Jewish Community. All Catholics should boycott the New York Times, it is prejudiced against Traditional Catholics. I have been going to the Latin Tridentine Mass for two months now and I would encourage my fellow Catholics to attend a Tridentine Mass.

  • Peg
    November 3, 2009 Reply

    Our church is never so grand as when it defies the spirit of the age! Go Archbp. Go!

  • Kevin Donnelly
    November 3, 2009 Reply

    Kudos to Archbishop Tim Dolan! The evil that is perpetrated in the media against the Catholic religion is out of control. We must confront and expose it for its true nature which is to attack that which is ultimately good. Keep It Up!

  • Jay H
    November 3, 2009 Reply

    Your Excellency: While I agree completely with your assessment, I think it’s important that we Catholics not get caught in the trap of a victim mentality. We can point out where others are hypocritical or wrong without impugning motives to bigotry, as we cannot know the motives of those who criticize our beloved Church. I think there is also a danger in saying that “America” has a national pastime of anti-Catholicism. I think this goes too far. Are there bigots out there? Absolutely. But some would interpret this statement as critical of America, and I know that is not your intent. Those who disparage us “know not what they do.” They speak based on ignorance or use an unfortunate experience as a prism with which to view the entire Church. We, the Church, are capable of great things and do great things. Thank you again, Your Excellency, for shining the light of truth upon falsehood and ignorance.

  • Lisa Graas
    November 3, 2009 Reply

    Archbishop Dolan, no matter how they come after you, no matter how they revile you, remember the faithful to whom you bring so much joy. We are praying for you and we rejoice in your vocation. We applaud you for speaking out against anti-Catholicism and for promoting the Faith whenever and wherever possible. You are a champion of the Church and we love you.

  • Dan Callahan
    November 3, 2009 Reply

    Thank God for Archbishop Dolan! Finally a man who is political but not afraid of politicians and being politically correct.

  • Jeanne Thom-Wisconsin
    November 3, 2009 Reply

    Archbishop Dolan, It takes a lot of courage to speak out today because the forces of evil are so prevalant, and I commend you for that courage! I wish all the bishops would rally around you to take a firm stand on the Catholic bias that we encounter from our secular media. However, they must do a better job in giving guidelines than they did with “Faithful Citizenship”, and hopefully they will have the courage to revise it. You are definitely giving the example of leading your episcopal brothers, and we pray they will “see and follow”. You will be in my prayers. America needs men of this type of courage and conviction. ALL for Christ!

  • Brad Utpadel
    November 3, 2009 Reply

    Thank you Archbishop Dolan! Your words will be spread across the land of 10,000 lakes. It seems like the most vindictive voice comes from those who are “cafeteria Catholics” or “fallen away” like Dowd. Their status some how gives them the right to become the hypocrisy police. Somehow if they hate the church the world gives them credibility and that should be their first sign that they are on the wrong side. Archbishop Dolan thank you for leading the way and showing a little outrage that has inspired me. Peace in Christ from Minnesota.

  • Matt Hayes
    November 3, 2009 Reply

    Your excellency, people have been waiting decades for someone from WITHIN the church to lead the charge on this. And David (who has commented above), the answer to your question is yes. Some of Dowd’s piece is misleading and some of it is just untrue. Do you really think it is appropriate to use the term “über-conservative” to describe the pope, particular when the term is followed by a sentence that mentions his membership in the Hitler Youth, which is — almost unbelievably — followed by Dowd’s deliberately inaccurate description of the Richard Williamson episode? It is a smear, plain and simple. It’s not intended to illuminate the reader or even to add emphasis to Dowd’s own opinion, it is intended to inflame the reader by playing on his prejudices, and to that extent it is no different from a columnist mentioning in his critique of an influential rabbi that he once observed the man stop to pick up a penny from a sidewalk. Ugly, isn’t it?

  • Jose Navarro
    November 3, 2009 Reply

    Thanks, Archbishop!!

  • Olegario
    November 3, 2009 Reply

    Bishop Dolan, I am not a Catholic but I am a believing Christian. I agree that the media,print and visual, has taken to attack the only faith that they can attack and get away with it. They would never dare to speak out against Islam or any of the other faiths. We have been fair game for far to long. It is time to say enough.

  • Rebecca Isaac
    November 3, 2009 Reply

    Bravo, our dear Archbishop! So glad you came East!!! Let’s hope that all other Bishops, esp. in the USCCB, enjoy the courage, wisdom and knowledge to defend the Body of Christ, so unmercifully under attack from the likes of the New York Times and its “motley, misguided crew”! May the Holy Spirit continue to power your valiant response to the “evils” of the day, as you seek to inspire all Catholics fighting to survive in this “impoverished” nation! In the Year of the Priest…we are so proud of you!! You have our prayers and encouragement! Abundant graces and blessings will enable you to expose and denounce the attractive, convenient (but salacious) lies seeking to “neutralize” the Eternal Truth that energizes the life of the Church!

  • Thomas
    November 3, 2009 Reply

    Thank you, Archbishop Dolan, for your defense of the Church and Catholic values. Many people seem to believe that the Church should not become embroiled in the dirt and grime of the secular world. But I disagree. Too often, we see men of faith retreating into the shadows, while all around them, there is human suffering and misery. Jesus didn’t hide himself away in a temple. He went out among the people, and he wasn’t afraid to speak against and overturn the metaphorical carts of evil-doers. If the Church is to have any voice at all, someone in addition to Pope Gregory needs to make it very clear where the Church stands, and fight against secular voices that want to marginalize the Church. Some of these voices will argue that, because the Church hasn’t been perfect in the past, that it doesn’t deserve to have a voice. Which is nonsense. It’s a false proposition. The Church has clearly learned a valuable lesson about clergy abuses, it has put in place much needed reforms, and shouldn’t be silenced by those who are imperfect and yet demand perfection in order to engage in public discourse.

  • Virginia Williams
    November 3, 2009 Reply

    Bravo, Archbishop Dolan! Call them on this at last! I read the Times every day(mostly for its coverage of the arts) but scrupulously avoid the editorials and Op-Ed pieces since I do not share the politics and liberal policies of the newspaper. However, I am still exposed to the anti-Catholic bias of the newspaper as evidenced in the “news” that it chooses to report and chooses to omit, in the prominence afforded certain stories and in the general disrespectful tone toward the Pope and the Church, my Church. In short, the paper never misses a chance to bash the Church. Please continue to speak up for us, Your Excellency, and help to make the Times understand that their anti-Catholicism is unacceptable in the 21st century! The same Times that is so very politically correct!

  • Rosita the Prole
    November 3, 2009 Reply

    Thank you so much for speaking out against anti-catholicism. I noticed the Times’ articles too, and I had the same thought regarding the Franciscan priest who fathered a child out of wedlock twenty years ago- how is this news? how is this front page news? The New York Times’s reputation (and circulation) has waned dramatically, and prejudice like this is why.

  • Joseph Metzler
    November 3, 2009 Reply

    Your Excellancy, Thank you for saying what many Christians are thinking & whispering but are afraid to say publicly. Hopefully, more Christians will start to publicly voice their sentiments about all the Anti-Christian bashing that has been going on in the media. Especially, in the NY Times.

  • Enrico Calini
    November 3, 2009 Reply

    Your Excellence, I found myself as an Italian in the US. Today the European Suprem Court decided that the Crosses in Italian schools are not legitimate, as they hurt other peoples and religions sensitivity. Which is interesting since SwissAir had to take the Cross (of the Swiss flag) off, when flying into Saudi Arabia. Forget the fact that the Benedictine and nobody else built Europe. I guess the time is coming isn’t it?

  • DEacon Tom Cornell
    November 3, 2009 Reply

    Anti-religious and especially anti-Catholic prejudice has been destructive of the goals of progressives, the biggest anbd most costly mistake they have ever made. Our Archbishop Dolan is a chapion of human rights. The NY Times has disgraced itself.

  • Rob from St. Paul
    November 3, 2009 Reply

    It’s nice to see such a gentle man communicate such an abrupt truth.

  • Alexis Hoffman
    November 3, 2009 Reply

    Archbishop, we are victims of our own guilt so often joked about in the media. We, as Catholics, identify our faults and failings and perpetually feel guilty about them. Even after we have repented and been granted absolution, we sometimes still carry our guilt as a reminder of our mortality. We do not feel empowered to stand up to those who take advantage of this guilt. But we must stand up and remind those who throw stones at us that while we are mere mortals, we are capable of growth and finding God’s grace through experience. We fall down, we get up, and we move forward like man has done since the Garden of Eden. Any group worth it’s salt has followed this path. It is the only thing that ensures our survival. So I ask that you let your next piece be about all of the positive things the Church has done to move forward.

  • Peter Maloney
    November 3, 2009 Reply

    Would that the bishops of the Catholic Church had responded with such alacrity to the sexual predators it protected and foisted on an unknowing public for generations. The Archbishop’s suggestion that the Times took a harder line against sexual predators in the Catholic Church than it did against similar malefactors in Brooklyn’s Orthodox Jewish Community is utter sophistry as well as a blatant smokescreen. He seems to be saying “give our predators a break,they’re no worse than others.” As to his claim that the Times is anti-Catholic, that’s patently absurd. He’s preaching to the choir at Fox News, where facts are never allowed to get in the way of an apoplectic rant and eminent Catholics like Bill O’Reilly and Sean Hannity will give this sophistry the widest possible airplay.

  • Kathleen
    November 3, 2009 Reply

    Thank-you for speaking up for Catholics. We love you and you have our full support. God Bless you for defending the Catholic Church.

  • Arlene Flaherty, OP
    November 3, 2009 Reply

    I don’t think that those who are calling the Catholic Chruch to accountability for its abuses, are guility of anti-Catholicism. I do agree however that all religious groups who are similarly guilty but spared scurinty and should be called out as well. It is not anti-Catholicism to call the Church to integrity. But it is justice to hold all groups to the same scrutiny.

  • Jose E. Ribe
    November 3, 2009 Reply

    Thank you very much Archbishop Dolan for your response to the slanders of Maureen Dowd. It happens that for some people the gospel is really unconfortable because they can not marry twice, or they can not make abortion or they have to go to Church every Sunday. For these people the Church is really a headache and therefore they want to express their annoyance defameing our mother the Holy Catholic Church.

  • Fergus Jackson
    November 3, 2009 Reply

    Keep up the good work Archbishop Dolan !!!

  • Eagle_eye
    November 3, 2009 Reply

    A true shepherd actively defends the faith and I am proud to see Archbishop Dolan doing that here. Thank you Archbishop for doing your job even amidst the anti-Catholics! Prayers!

  • Phil Brady
    November 3, 2009 Reply

    When the Bishops refuse to “clean house” by removing priests, religious and lay ministers who live lives contrary to the Faith, our only remaining hope is that the Holy Spirit will act. Scripture tells us that, “Your sin will find you out” and SILENCE is a sin. When anti-catholic bishops are allowed to stay in power due to the SILENCE of their brother bishops, an environment is created where heresy takes hold, offending many of the faithful. Bishops who serve the Prince of Peace need to protect the flock by rooting out these “wolves in sheep’s clothing” and be less worried about a media that serves the prince of this world !

  • Jane
    November 3, 2009 Reply

    Dear Archbishop, Thank you for articulating these points. I recently discontinued my Times subscription, which I had kept in force for twenty years, for these reasons among others. The Times is completely biased and Ms. Dowd’s “writing” is tedious, mean-spirited and utterly predictable. We need more people to stand up for Catholicism.

  • Guillermo Rostom Maderna
    November 3, 2009 Reply

    Your Excelency: I write you from Buenos Aires. I saw your assumption on TV (EWTN) and I want to express my congratulations for your ministery, your courage and your leadership. Thank you for your service to the Church and the people. Father Guillermo Rostom Maderna

  • John Wachman
    November 3, 2009 Reply

    Archbishop Dolan: Well done & spot on! Please continue to speak out and lead on this issue. We need the church leadership to call the media to task for the obvious lack of respect and fairness for the Catholic Church and its faithful. God bless you and keep you strong!

  • Mandelay
    November 3, 2009 Reply

    Bravo! Thank you for standing up for us.

  • Edward Wlson
    November 3, 2009 Reply

    Archbishop Dolan appears to confuse 19th century nativism, which involved native-born Protestants’ prejudice directed at a largely immigrant Catholic population, with a more recent phenomenon. The recent situation involves the descendants of those 19th century immigrants who are now well-educated, mostly in Catholic institutions. These educated lay Catholics, along with a fair number of priests and a significant number of nuns, are expressing their resentment over their hierarchy’s insularity, secretiveness, and arrogance as exhibited in the cover-up of clerical sexual abuse until this scandal was exposed by the secular press in 2002. Our bishops’ handling of this issue has been spotty ever since. It has also become increasingly apparent that our bishops’ handling of church finances has been far from adequate. For example, the Archdiocese of New York has not published financial statements for well over 20 years. Another example is the expenditure by the Diocese of Portland, Maine of over $600,000 to defeat a current gay-marriage referendum in that state. The best defense against media criticism of the Catholic Church would be meaningful lay participation in the affairs of our church as urged by organizations such as Voice of the Faithful. It is interesting, however, that Archbishop Dolan appears to have serious concerns, as do many lay persons, about the current Vatican visitation and investigation of American nuns. This visitation is being conducted in secrecy and the report may never be revealed. Moreover, those assisting in the investigation are limited to persons who will sign an extensive loyalty oath. Archbishop Dolan and his fellow American bishops are in the best position to do something to head off or civilize this apparent inquisition. If they are doing anything, they are doing so in secret. American lay Catholics are entitled to know what is going on. Edward N. Wilson Brooklyn

  • MAC GROUP
    November 3, 2009 Reply

    I found this yesterday on AOL or Yahoo news but it has since disappeared. I now find it at: Archdiocese of New York – blog – The gospel in the digital age. Finally our Bishops are beginning to fight back at the slanted news against Catholics. Then I find that the NY Times didn’t print this. Not surprising.

  • Bob Murphy
    November 3, 2009 Reply

    I see the time has come. Go get ’em Archbishop. We love you and pray for you. You are our Shepherd – Defend Your Flock!!

  • Larry Phillips
    November 4, 2009 Reply

    Archbishop’s Dolan’s claim that criticism of Catholicism is largely based on anti-Catholic prejudice is extraordinarily misguided. News about abuse by Catholic priests is newsworthy not because of prejudice, but because it is further evidence of the enormity of these crimes – their duration and world-wide scope, especially since these crimes have been committed by men who claim to be transformed by Christ’s love. It is often pointed out only a small fraction of priests engaged in this behavior, and that is true. However, the important fact is the entire hierarchy of the church, at all levels, conspired to cover up these crimes over a period of decades, and steps were taken to stop the abuse only when it was forced on them by the revelations of some of the victims. The Ryan Report, which was released this year, and which documented 50 years of priest abuse in Ireland, stated in its summary that “Abuse was not a failure of the system. It was the system.” I am a non-religious person, and harbor no particular bias toward Catholicism. When I look at the facts however, I can only see this scandal as a shocking case of institutionalized evil. For the church to try to cast itself as a victim of prejudice, and to say that other groups also committed crimes, is highly disrespectful of the Church’s thousands of victims, and it only deepens the moral abyss it has fallen into. The Catholic Church desperately needs to find a better answer when the truth of their failings is pointed out.

  • Associate
    November 4, 2009 Reply

    If Archbishop Doyle were in touch with the people he would easily see that Maureen Dowd speaks the truth. Hers was an excellent article presenting facts of the investigation in progress of some of the American Sisters. These days the hierarchy is more into lies and cover ups, so it is perfectly natural to understand why the archbishop did not recognize the truth when he saw it. It is reasonable to believe that most of the congratulatory messages on this blog come from people who have not been inside a convent for years, if ever, or have they had a serious, in-depth discussion with a Sister recently. This would also apply to much of the hierarchy. Investigating is so much simpler than cultivating a relationship with the person or group being investigated. Who knows? The Holy Spirit might have even entered into the process and real understanding might have taken place.

  • John Reagan
    November 4, 2009 Reply

    Dear Archbishop: I understand your anger and frustration at the frequency with which the Catholic Church is routinely attacked. But I am surprised that you would expect anything else. When I was being raised as a Catholic child, I was taught that the Church would always be under assault—it was to be expected and even desired. You may differ with me on that. But what I am most disappointed to see is the comparison of anti-Catholic comment with anti-Semitism. There has been and never will be any Kristallnacht directed against Catholics in this country. It is offensive to to make a comparison between criticism of Catholicism with anti-Semitism.

  • Grant A. Rice
    November 4, 2009 Reply

    Your Excellency – Thank you for putting in to words what many Catholics experience in person everyday in our city and across our nation. Your clear and concise approach and willingness to speak openly about anti-Catholicism can only aid in bringing this long held bias to the forefront for open and honest discussion. Your forthrightness and willingness to speak out against such things makes me proud to be a member of this Archdiocese and even prouder to call you my Bishop.

  • Elg SChlubach
    November 4, 2009 Reply

    I write from Italy as italian reading also german news. The “Spiegel” is another anticatholic paper. When they can they point their fingers about some flaws in the Church which they never do with islamics or other faith. I was thinking about it and found that we should rejoice. Truth has been always controversial in the news.Sad is that the young are influenced and I have to discuss with my grandchildren who dont know much about history but a los about the inquisition, mostly in the wrong ,not historic way. We should get used to it and start to pray together through the blog for” thruth and justice in the news”

  • Mary
    November 4, 2009 Reply

    Thank you, Archbishop Doland and PLEASE keep talking about this.

  • Florentius
    November 4, 2009 Reply

    Thank you so much for speaking out. We are in such desperate need of strong voices like yours to speak the truth to power. I pray that God will continue to give you the strength and courage to do so.Our prayers are with you!

  • Karen Brauer
    November 4, 2009 Reply

    The NYT is passe, shrinking, a vestige of its former self. So, Archbishop Dolan, who cares if they would not publish your well composed reply to Maureen. We are linking it up all over the internet and adding supportive commentary.

  • Dan Lapinski
    November 4, 2009 Reply

    I am sending this to our MAC group. I found it in the AOL or Yahoo news Monday but it disappeared soon. I was happy that FINALLY our bishops came to the defense of us in the Catholic bashing that is so popular. As he says anti-catholicism is the only prejudice that is acceptable today. Hope you are well. Jim

  • Jim Barrett
    November 4, 2009 Reply

    I am a Catholic from Chicago. I found your op-ed piece on AOL or Yahoo news Monday only to find that it disappeared quickly. I wonder why? FINALLY our Bishops spoke out against the anti-Catholic media bias we are constantly facing. Then I saw that your comments were not published. If the facts disprove your position, just ignore them, right? Please keep up the good work. We need you

  • ugl1820
    November 4, 2009 Reply

    Your Excellency,I am writing from Spain, and I totally agree with your point of view. Here, in the old Europe, things are even worse. Today, the Strasbourg Court has given the reason to an Italian mother in her demand, asking the government to eliminate crucifixes in schools.It is a shame that we, western people, forget our origins, and despise the roots of our socity.I pray to God to guide you in knowing the difficult task of proclaiming the Gospel in the midst of relativism. Good bless you.

  • Jim G
    November 4, 2009 Reply

    Interesting Article

  • Veronica Scaglione
    November 4, 2009 Reply

    Thank you Archbishop Dolan for defending our great Catholic faith. You are a wonderful leader!

  • Henry C. Malon
    November 4, 2009 Reply

    Bravo! It’s about time our shepherds recognized the seriousness of this problem and the damage it has been causing to the Church in recent years! Too many of its members have relied on the secular media for their news and accepted as accurate and truthful the many falsehoods and misrepresentations about the Church which have been promoted by the media with a consequent loss of faith. Turning the other cheek does not require silence. Nor does the spirit of ecumenism. Why are so many of our other bishops so silent on this problem?

  • Virgniia Williams
    November 4, 2009 Reply

    Mr. Wilson of Brooklyn (see below) should know that according to MSNBC.com, gay marriage has now been defeated in every single state (31, to be exact) in which it has been put to a POPULAR vote. The same website reports that gay rights activists in Maine mounted a “well-financed” campaign. Thus if it’s true that the Diocese of Portland spent over half a million dollars on a campaign to repeal the state law, I have no problem with it. In any case, the state legislature is out of touch with the people it purports to represent, as is the case in some 30 other states, where the voters refuse to be brainwished into abandoning their moral values.

  • Caroline Niesley
    November 4, 2009 Reply

    Excellency, Thank you for your wisdom and leadership in response to media bias. Ms. Dowd’s ignorant drivel was maddening to read. Apart from prayer, what can we do for Catholics who have spiritually left the Church but seem bent on destroying it from within using disinformation? Fr. Groeschel said he’s going to read the Wall Street Journal now and so am I.

  • Michael Hoban
    November 4, 2009 Reply

    Me parece muy importante y muy acertado el articulo escrito por Monseñor Dolan. Mi pregunta es ¿se publica el blog en español para los cientos de miles de católicos de habla hispana de la Arquidiócesis? Fr. Michael Hoban, Santiago de Chile

  • Laurie Goodstein
    November 4, 2009 Reply

    I am the national religion correspondent at The New York Times, and sent this letter to Archbishop Dolan yesterday. I would like to share it with the readers of his blog. Dear Archbishop Dolan, I was very disturbed to read your blog post about The New York Times, and about my work and that of my colleagues as “anti-Catholic.” You write as though the Catholic Church is some sort of special target, when in fact any institution that is accused of wrongdoing receives critical coverage and commentary. As you know, the Catholic Church is the largest religious institution in the world, and a quarter of Americans are adherents. The Catholic Church is a hierarchical church with a clear chain of accountability. It is only natural that it receives such scrutiny. As you acknowledged in your blog, there are recent developments in the Church that are “well-worth discussing and hardly exempt from legitimate questioning.” So when a newspaper undertakes this kind of coverage, it should not be seen as anti-Catholic. If so, we could equally be accused of being anti-Every religious group that we have called to task, and there are many. You cite Paul Vitello’s front page story about sexual abuse in the Orthodox Jewish community as evidence that the Times is anti-Catholic. Paul and I find it a hard argument to understand. The Times has written about the sexual abuse of minors by clergy of many faiths: Jews, Southern Baptists, mainline Protestants, Jehovah’s Witnesses, Orthodox Christians, evangelicals. But the abuse story has been bigger for the Catholic Church simply because of the quantitative facts: there are more priests accused, more alleged victims, more countries involved, more settlements, more years since the problem first became public, more legal and financial consequences and simply more people affected. In mentioning my piece about a priest who had an affair with an adult woman, you imply that there was no reason to run a story now that is 20 years old. You neglected to acknowledge that this piece was written now because the priest’s son is dying of brain cancer, he believes the church and the priest have failed him, and because the priest was still serving in a parish where neither his parishioners nor his bishop had knowledge of his philandering until I began reporting. One of the women he was involved with was allegedly a minor, and at one point the priest suggested that a pregnancy he was responsible for be terminated by an abortion. I wrote the story because church officials have said privately to me over the years that priests who violate their vows with adult women are far more common than priests who sexually abuse minors. Also, I have also been contacted over the years by adult women in similar situations. I wrote about this woman because she was willing to go public with her experience and had the legal documentation and photographs to prove that this was more than a case of he said/she said. You claim that the Times ran this story instead of covering Afghanistan, health care and the Sudan, but as you know the Times is regularly full of stories about all these issues. And finally, you cite as “anti-Catholic” the coverage of Pope Benedict XVI’s new structure for welcoming traditionalist Anglicans into the Catholic Church. The Times’ story did state clearly, as you pointed out, that the arrangement was a response to requests from some Anglicans. Certainly, the Vatican is “welcoming” these Anglicans, but many other Anglicans feel as if the church were making a bid for their allegiances. Our story used language reflecting these various points of view. Our coverage did not differ much from most of the media coverage, except that we were far more tempered than some. Archbishop Dolan, you and I have known one another since we first met in Rome in 1998 when you were rector at the North American College. We met again years later when I was doing a story about you and several others whom I dubbed “Healer Bishops” who were trying to help the church recover from the scandal over sexual abuse by priests. I am pained that your blog selectively overlooked all the articles in the Times that you and other bishops in the church have praised over the years because you found them fair, and there are many (including some about your appointment to the Archdiocese of New York). This is why I cannot accept your characterization of the Times as “anti-Catholic.” This weekend, I am going to the conference of the American Academy of Religion, the largest society of religion scholars, to receive their top journalism award for a three-part series I did last year on the Catholic Church. The subject was international priests serving in the church, and the series included stories about a Kenyan priest beloved by his Kentucky parishioners, an American vicar who selects foreign priests to serve in his diocese, and why so many young Indians choose vocations in the Catholic Church. To do these pieces, I spent many weeks in American parishes and a week living in a seminary in India. If the Times were “anti-Catholic,” why would it devote the reporting time and three consecutive front page stories to a fair and affectionate look at the contemporary Catholic Church? Sincerely, Laurie Goodstein National Religion Correspondent The New York Times

  • Manuel
    November 4, 2009 Reply

    Arzobispo Dolan, le escribo desde España, comparto su opinión sobre la crítica injustificada y desmedida hacia el católicismo, en realidad a todo el cristianismo. Los católicos tenemos que aceptar nuestros graves errores, pedir perdón e intentar que no se vuelvan a producir. Sin embargo, la lucha entre el laicismo y el cristianismo (quizás la única religión que se desarrolla en sociedades democráticas, plurales, libres, tecnológicamente avanzadas) se está haciendo cada vez más dura. Algo parecido ha pasado en su país con el anterior presidente y el actual, parece que su gran error ha sido demostrar publicamente su fe en Cristo. En fin, que la Esperanza no nos abandone nunca. Paz con todos.

  • Enrique Soros
    November 4, 2009 Reply

    Bishop Dolan: FIRST: you publish Laurie Goodstein’s letter, from NY Times. Does the Times publish your letter??? SECOND: She does not answer to your main concerns, namely: “Yet the Times did not demand what it has called for incessantly when addressing the same kind of abuse by a tiny minority of priests: release of names of abusers, rollback of statute of limitations, external investigations, release of all records, and total transparency.” CONGRATULATIONS BISHOP DOLAN!! Don’t ever expect the NY Times to be fair with the Catholic Church, don’t expect that from the media at all!!

  • Dr. Thomas B. Lucente
    November 4, 2009 Reply

    It would seem we have read two different articles! The Bishop did not criticize your coverage of the 20 year old story of the Franciscan priest but its prominence on the front page. Nor did he accuse the NYT for not covering the various “war” stories etc. Citing so called good stories that have been printed by the NYT does nothing to excuse the obvious anti Catholic,,,,no,,,anti Christian sentiment of your paper. I have stopped reading it years ago….You seemed to have skipped right over the most obvious fact…the Church is seen as having deep pockets. In this litigous society this is a fact that should not be overlooked. The Bishop objected to your paper’s acceptance of the Chief Rabbis dealing with their internal problems without an insistence of the same kind of legitimate scrutiny given to abuse in the Catholic clergy…..The number is not important…even one case of sexual abuse should not be tolerated. I don’t think any Catholic objects to the coverage of what we all believe to be an abomination. I suspect we all are asking for fair reporting. To point out a few postivie articles does nothing to excuse the pervasive anti Catholic tone of most of the news. It reminds me of the bigot who proclaims…some of my best friends are black or Jewish or Latino. Protest as you will, the Bishop is right on target. Let me remind you, he is not justifying a sinful, sick act in any way. I believe the tone of his article was honest and fair.It should have been printed by the NYT.

  • Noreen and Hank Dalpiaz
    November 4, 2009 Reply

    Thank you, Archbishop Dolan!!! It is refreshing to have someone with conviction speak up on behalf of Catholics. It is a fact that it is socially acceptable nowadays to bash Catholics and we all need to be outspoken against this prejudice.

  • Mike Perigo
    November 4, 2009 Reply

    It doesn’t take a NY Times staffer to know that anti-Catholicism is rampant in our increasingly post-Christian American society. As a grad student at an Indiana Catholic seminary, I talk with fellow students (some who are Protestant) from across the US, and especially here in the Midwest. All have experienced institutional anti-Catholic bigotry of some kind or another. Especially on secular college campuses and in the secular media, the Catholic Church is targeted, yes, “targeted”, for special treatment, ridicule and loathing. God bless you, Archbishop Dolan, for your plain talk.

  • Jane
    November 4, 2009 Reply

    Dear Archbishop, I was chagrined to see Ms. Goodstein’s rambling and strident response to your blog post. Ms. Goldstein’s reporting is one of the reasons I cancelled my subscription to the New York Times. It has struck me as strange that the Times assigns a non-Catholic to report on Catholic issues, yet other religions are afforded coverage by a reporter of the same faith. Similarly, I have been struck by the prominence the Times gives–front page, above the fold– to controversial and sensational pieces about Catholics and certain ethnic groups, and yet buries pieces about others elsewhere in the newspaper. For many years, I relished subscribing to the Times as I genuinely felt it provided thorough, unbiased reporting and informed editorials and op-ed pieces, but sadly that is no longer so–and it has not been so for at least the past few years.

  • Maricruz
    November 5, 2009 Reply

    Congratulations, Archbishop Dolan. I´m writing from Central America proud to find on the web an Archbishop who speaks out on the defense of our beloved Church. Please, have no doubt that you´ll be on our prayers. God bless you and thanks.

  • Kell Brigan
    November 5, 2009 Reply

    Is it appropriate to send Archbishops fan letters? : ) (Personally, I think Archbishop Dolan should not list “Banned by the New York Times” up front and center on his c.v.)

  • Pat Hill
    November 5, 2009 Reply

    As I do every morning driving in to work, I was listing to the Catholic Channel on Sirus XM radio and heard Gus Lloyd talking about this article. I can not thank you enough for speaking out. May God continue to bless you!

  • Matthew
    November 5, 2009 Reply

    Archbishop Dolan, Your article is spot on. I am not Catholic but I am disgusted by the way the mainstream media gets a free pass when criticizing Catholicism and other mainstream Christian faiths. Such criticism of other world religions would illicit cries of racism of bigotry. Thank you for your leadership and desire to keep the media honest.

  • Curt
    November 5, 2009 Reply

    St. Louis misses you Archbishop Dolan.

  • Carolyn Disco
    November 5, 2009 Reply

    I find Laurie Goodstein’s response far more persuasive than Dolan’s post. It is far too easy to fall back on charges of anti-Catholicism when the coverage hits home. As an advocate for clergy abuse survivors, I found the NYTimes very difficult to engage compared to other publications. The emotional outpouring of Catholics here supporting Dolan speaks more to fatigue with the scandal than the facts. In that light it is a barometer of misplaced discontent. But blaming the messenger is no excuse. I had expected better from Dolan. But it is undeniably a good PR move from his stance: play on people’s fatigue and maybe forestall more unpleasant coverage. Smart approach.

  • The Rev. David Terwilliger
    November 5, 2009 Reply

    Thank you Archbishop Dolan for your article. The funny thing about dealing with the NY Times is that – as with any such entity – the harder they suppress the truth, the more the truth will get out if Christians are faithful in witnessing to it. Of course, our Lord Jesus Christ has something to say about the beatitude of those who are persecuted and have uttered against them falsehoods for His name-sake. It is precisely there where we see Christ at work in the world today and with the cross of Jesus as our calling, our haven, and glory. I am Anglican priest who is deeply saddened by the past and current anti-Catholic attitudes and actions in North America. It is the duty of every Christian – one Lord, one Faith, one Baptism – to exhibit fraternal love for each other (by this Jesus said, “they” – the world – “will know they you are my disciples.”). Thank you once again for your article and God’s Peace be upon you.

  • Michael Carlon
    November 5, 2009 Reply

    As a cradle Catholic who was insulated in a blanket of Catholicism for most of his youth, I never experienced anti-Catholic bias. I went to Catholic schools, my neighbors were Catholic, my parents friends were Catholic and I did not know any differently. Then I left home, went to a public university, and felt like the odd man out. It was only after being in “the world” that I saw evidence of anti-Catholic bias all around me. Now that my eyes have been opened to such a bias, it is hard not to see. We are not perfect, our halos are all busted, but do we deserve such treatment? The New York Times is certainly one culprit, but our own local paper in Stamford CT has the church in its crosshairs on a regular basis. Our local Knights of Columbus find it extremely difficult to get local city editors interested in works of charity. I have never seen an article touting our Bishop’s appeal and the fact that money collected from this appeal makes the Catholic church the single largest provider of social welfare services in the state. Rather, the paper prints articles in support of planned parenthood. Recently, there was an article – in our LOCAL paper – showing a statistic suggesting that 70,000 women die every year due to “back alley” abortions in countries where this practice of murder is still illegal. Note, I don’t think their pencil is sharp enough…if that is true, the figure should read at least 140,000 PEOPLE die from such a practice but I digress. Their answer, make abortion legal. How do we get zero people to die from unsafe abortions, DON’T HAVE AN ABORTION. ABSTAIN FROM SEX. Now, the paper is bringing up a matter which was settled a decade ago – clergy sexual abuse by priests in the diocese of Bridgeport. An inexcusable act, but why are they interested in bringing it up again? Because taking on the Church means selling more newspapers. My thanks go to Archbishop Dolan and his eloquent letter for giving those of us in “the silent majority” a voice in this fight. That said, we as a Church need to be equally proactive. Write letters to the editor of your local papers in support of the Faith. Let us all become soldiers of Christ and make our voices heard.

  • Frank
    November 5, 2009 Reply

    Thank you Archbishop Dolan. After years of purchasing my daily New York Times I have discontinued reading there onesided opinions. I will add the cost to my weekly offering. The Church deserves it much more than the Times…after all did they start any education system, social service networks, or take the lead in music and art. I am proud to be Catholic and by the way I am a liberal. The truth is the truth; and if the Times can give their opinion but not respect the opinions of others it is not worth reading.

  • Mary Ellen Cherry
    November 5, 2009 Reply

    Your Excellency,we just cancelled our subscription to the NY Times, looks like the Grey Lady can do without our Catholic dollars/

  • Antoni Monserrat
    November 6, 2009 Reply

    Thank you, Archbishop Dolan, for the clear messages you are giving. We need this kind of guidance.

  • Holy spirit prep
    November 6, 2009 Reply

    Hello from D-Period class at Holy Spirit Prep school in Atlanta, GA! We love your blog! Dolan we <3 u!

  • Fr. Ray Suriani
    November 6, 2009 Reply

    Archbishop, You continue to be an inspiration and a great “coach” to us priests, as well as to those preparing for ministry.

  • Crystal
    November 6, 2009 Reply

    Thank you, Archbishop Dolan, for your eloquently candid remarks. I pray that your brother bishops courageously and charitably critique the media as you have done. We, lay Catholics, need the moral support of the heirarchy. We are the church militant and as such the foot soldiers of our church leaders. Thank you for sounding a clear and loud battle cry.

  • Jeff Frievalt
    November 6, 2009 Reply

    We have always known what a treasure you were while you led the church in SE Wisconsin. New York is blessed to have you. Terrific artical!

  • Lulubelle
    November 6, 2009 Reply

    I am a female who grew up in NYC and was raised attending catholic schools and church all my life. In the 1970s, I watched the Church “uncloister” the nuns and direct them to go into the world, find jobs and apartments and support themselves, because the church could no longer do so. The church did this to the nuns despite the fact that many of their families and friends gave huge donations to the order (the church) when the nuns entered, in consideration of the lifelong care that the church was to give to the nuns. During the 70s, the church lost a great deal of nuns and, since that time, has had a “recruitment” problem with respect to nuns and priests. The acts of the church in the 70s was viewed by me and many as a “doublecross” and a betrayal. Now, the nuns who stayed in the order find themselves elderly and must solicit (beg) for donations so they can receive the basic nursing and other care they need. The church seems to have abandoned them once again–a triple cross. During this 40-50-year time span, the nuns never had a vote or voice in any church matter. More dedicated, devout people I have never seen. Their treatment by the church has been a disgrace–just as big a disgrace as the church’s handling of pedophile priests over the same time span (hide them and move them and silence them). Women who have grown up in the catholic church and remain faithful to the tenets of the religion have grown to despise the treatment of nuns by the church and the church’s treatment of women generally, just as they despise the manner in which the church has handled its pedophile priests. This sentiment is NOT “anti-catholic” as you characterize them; instead, it is VERY CATHOLIC as it is rooted in a love of god, the tenets of the religion, a deep concern over the the church and concepts of right and wrong. Maureen Dowd cares, I care and millions of women care about these issues but, of course, the church does not allow women a voice. I hope you and the rest of the church hierarchy, all male, stop “pigeon-holing” the criticism of your actions as “anti-catholic” and, instead, start reflecting on providing women in the church with a voice and vote so their concerns and needs are adequately met by the church. I would like to see that in my lifetime.

  • Gary Aguilar
    November 7, 2009 Reply

    Criticizing odious policies of The Church, as Maureen Doud has, is no more anti-Catholic than criticizing the odious policies of Israel is anti-Semitic. Let’s not forget that the early critics of the Church’s abysmal handling of its pedophile problem were similarly denounced and ignored on grounds they were “anti-Catholic.” Archbishop Dolan’s conflating the two – the Church itself with its questionable practices/policies – is cynically strategic; it’s dishonest and it’s shameful. We have a right to expect more from our archbishops than that.

  • Irene Baldwin
    November 7, 2009 Reply

    The Archbishop threw a pretty harsh criticism of the NY Times out over the internet. As expected, this criticism generated a tremendous reaction from the blogs and from the mainstream press. Much of the ensuing conversation doesn’t seem very constructive. (And some of it sounds absolutely un-Christian). I think the Archbishop, since he started this fire, now has a responsibility to put it out.

  • Bob Wilkinson
    November 7, 2009 Reply

    was Milwaukee’s loss. During his tenure here, Archbishop Dolan was our much-beloved shepherd. He came to us after a scandal involving his predecessor, and brought healing and joy to us when we desperately needed it. Now the Holy Spirit has moved him to a higher calling, and I’m heartened to see that he has the fire necessary to be a true defender of the faith. It is sometimes said that in times of national emergency, we have had the “right person” come forward. At a time when Catholicism faces dire challenges, we are fortunate to have Archbishop Dolan as a leader. (from Milwaukee, WI)

  • Rex Sinquefield
    November 7, 2009 Reply

    It is time for all Catholics and intellectually honest readers to cancel their subscription to the NY Times.

  • Don Bosco
    November 7, 2009 Reply

    Laurie Goodstein is a little disingenuous in her response regarding the Times’s coverage of the Vatican’s announcement of new structures for welcoming Anglicans into the Catholic church. First, Archbishop Dolan’s description of the article much better matches reality than Goodstein’s. The reporters’ diction is telling. The report reads more like a story about an amoral, rapacious corporate raider preying on a weak rival than an evenhanded account about religious affairs: “an extraordinary bid to lure” Anglicans; “a rare opportunity, audaciously executed”; an attempt “to capitalize on deep divisions”; the “Vatican had engineered it on its own.” The article speaks for itself, and it supports the archbishop’s take on the matter. Second, the article did not “clearly state” as fact that the Vatican’s announcement was the result of concerted requests from disaffected Anglicans. There is a brief reference in two sentences, buried deep in the article, reporting that Cardinal Levada said that was the case. But no attempt was made to give context or support for Levada’s comment. It certainly would have been easy to find the Anglicans who made such requests. They haven’t exactly been in hiding. But a reader (who didn’t completely miss those brief sentences) would be left to wonder if the reporters were suggesting that the veracity of Cardinal Levada’s assertion should be doubted. This article is typical of the Times’s coverage of Catholicism.

  • J. Waldmann
    November 8, 2009 Reply

    Archbishop Dolan, in his blog commenting on the New York Times article, pointed out that the Church has been accused of many abuses and that what makes it tough is that many of the accusations are true. He then correctly says that other groups have committed abuses too, in some cases, many more, but that these are passed over in the media but the Catholic Church is singled out. If a group of ministers or rabbis or imams or gym teachers misbehave, not much is said, but if a priest acts badly it makes the front page. The Archbishop says that this is simply persecution. But although prejudice does indeed exist, it is more than that. On some level, without being conscious of it, everyone outside the Church somehow knows that the Catholic Church is the true one and they expected better of it. They expected every priest to be a true representative of Jesus Christ and were disappointed. But with all of this the real fault for the scandal lies with all of us. If we, clergy and laity, were as holy as we should have been then the actions of these men would have been seen as an aberration, but since we were not what we ought to have been the abuses were seen as typical of the Church. While we all share in this, the primary fault does lie with the bishops. They have not provided the needed leadership … in holiness. They have become, in many cases, simply CEO’s and fund raisers, administrators and in some cases politicians, whereas what they and we are called to be are simply saints, with them leading the way. For the Church to provide social services is fine and part of a Christian life, but the first service it must provide is training is holiness. Without that along with the other services, then the Church becomes just another organization like the Red Cross or Goodwill industries. Each one of us, lay and clergy, must be another Christ, each in our own area of life, and must be seen to be so. If that were the case, then instead of complaints about the Church, it would be seen to be what it is supposed to be, a true shining light. Even though those who complain about the Church recite all sorts of arguments against it, at the heart of it all is some past bad experience with some one representative of the Church. And at the root of every conversion to the Church or vocation to the priesthood is some good example of some Christian who with all their necessary human faults, still was a visible example of one struggling for holiness.

  • matt walsh
    November 8, 2009 Reply

    this is total bull. i grew up catholic and i was an altar boy. i have never in my life been asked to sit in the back of the bus. the catholic church is probably the largest, most powerful, longest-lived organization of modern times. it’s a contradiction of terms for such an organization to ever portray itself as a victim. and who cares? what’s even the point? the only point i can see is that this is a political protest intended to rabble-rouse, a la tea party bull, in hopes of retaining the already-faithful. how about some real insight or real guidance? the lack of those is the real reason catholics are defecting in droves.

  • kathleen yancey
    November 8, 2009 Reply

    Its routine policy for the Times’ to direct responses into the genre of a letter, so their direction in this matter is not an act of discrimation, but rather routine practice.

  • Elyse Hayes
    November 8, 2009 Reply

    Predictably, the public editor at the Times merely defends the NYT in the Sunday paper today – he does not objectively examine whether or not they are anti-Catholic. But thank you for the blog entry, Archbishop – at least you started a conversation.

  • Catie
    November 8, 2009 Reply

    Great technique, Archbishop Dolan!

  • Lois, Cardinal Dougherty ’64
    November 8, 2009 Reply

    When I read Dowd’s column, I had a rush of recognition and sadness. From kindergarten to twelfth grade, sisters (of St. Joseph, mostly)made us memorize that the Catholic Church was the one true church, no doubts allowed. If our babies were not baptized, they would be suspended in limbo for eternity. If we died with a mortal sin on our souls, unless we made an act of perfect contrition, we would burn in hell for eternity. “Perfect” contrition–we worried that we could never meet that standard. The nuns had such power over our fragile, developing minds and hearts and they used it in unkind and punishing ways. We were their victims. As I read Dowd’s column, it occurred to me that the nuns were victims as well–then and now. It explains their loving and yet punitive approach to relationships with us. If it was difficult for us, how must it have been–must it be–for them, continuing victims of a church whose all-male authoritarian and dogmatic leadership (can you call it leadership?)still punishes more than it loves,still judges more than it accepts, and still oppresses more than it enlightens and lifts up. Things are rarely what they seem–the feelings that so many express about the Catholic Church are not “anti”–that’s too simple. They are feelings of hurt that even a jolly but combative fellow like you cannot keep from coming into the light.

  • Joan L. Roccasalvo
    November 8, 2009 Reply

    Bishop Tobin’s invitation to Representative Patrick Kennedy to debate his comments about the Catholic Church should encourage other members of the episcopacy to do likewise. Over this weekend, pro-abortion Catholics in the House of Representative expressed their anger with the Stupack amendment rejecting federal funds for abortion practices. At stake is the Robert Drinan, SJ school of thinking about separation of church and state. It was he who tutored these pro-abortion leaders who now virulently and publicly oppose the Church on social issues precisely because of Fr. Drinan’s ‘standard’ of separation of church and state. In the meantime, the Catholic in the pew asks about outright scandal.

  • Frank Byrne
    November 8, 2009 Reply

    Your Excellency, I emailed the NY Times public editor today asking him to give you an OpEd to answer the snarky Ms.Dowd. I told him that if the unrepentant terrorist William Ayers can have his OpEd surely the Archbishop of New York can have his say in the name of Freedom of Speech. Not to morally equate you with him. I told the editor that you have better reporters than the New York Times…Matthew, Mark, Luke and John. Best wishes.

  • DJ
    November 8, 2009 Reply

    Your Excellency, I understand your outrage over what you perceive as an “anti-Catholic” bias on the part of the NY Times. But aside from some apparently unflattering stories, the Times has printed material that reflects positively on Catholics and the Church. Please take a deep breath, step back, and consider a salient point: The Roman Catholic Church is the single largest religious organization in the US, both in terms of organizational size (i.e. number of churches, other facilities, number of clergy and employees, etc.) and in terms of membership (something like 25% of the country is Catholic). This means the Catholic Church’s doings are going to tend to generate more news, than other religious groups will. All things being equal, it also means it will tend to generate more unflattering stories than other groups do. Overall there’s a strong tendency in the US for Christians … a constituency to which all Catholics, including yourself, belong … to view itself as being “under attack” by secularism. I suggest that at least some of this is merely an appearance, and not the reality. Yes, secularism is growing. It has been growing since the Enlightenment began. What has changed is that this trend has accelerated a bit in the last several decades. Nevertheless, this is but a part of a much-larger trend that has been a long time coming. It is not a sudden, drastic effort on the part of a malicious few to “destroy” Christianity or any single Christian organization. The fact is that, at one time, Christianity ran the show … and in most of Europe, that was what is now the Roman Catholic Church. For better or worse, though, times have changed. The Catholic Church no longer controls society as it once did, centuries ago. For that matter, it no longer speaks for all of Christendom, as it did before the Reformation. Nevertheless, and the appearance of being “under attack” aside … the Catholic Church in the US remains the single-largest segment of what remains the majority religion in this country. To perceive yourself and the rest of Catholicism as being “under attack” is, in essence, preposterous. As for the negative stories about the Catholic Church which have been in the mass media over the last several years, those are important, even if you might personally rather they not be reported. The reason is that Catholicism claims to be an arbiter of morality. Moral failings among those who say they should be able to dictate morals, are significant, and for that reason alone. To an extent, it’s possible for the Catholic Church to reduce the incidence of such stories, simply by improving its behavior and more stringently policing itself, and by being more transparent in how it operates. As for the issue of “fairness,” unfortunately that’s in the eye of the beholder. Most people in the US today, of all religious and ideological stripes, complain at some time or other about “bias” or “unfairness” in the media. What I have found is that, when they say things like this, what they actually mean is that a story did not happen to have been written in exactly the way they’d have written it themselves. This, however, does not actually constitute “bias” or “unfairness.” Lastly, I’d caution you, your Excellency — with all due respect — about holding up the example of child abuse among Orthodox Jews as somehow being evidence that the Times is maligning Catholicism unfairly. Anything that another religion does wrong, does not constitute permission for the Catholic Church to get away with the same behavior. That the stories were not written in the way you want them to have been written, does not take your Church off the hook for the abuse it committed. This is, essentially, “two wrongs make a right” thinking … and frankly, I’m astounded you would use it as a defense, much less claim it’s some kind of an attack on your Church. The truth of both of these matters, your Excellency, is that children were abused. That is something we should all be working against. And woe to those who would use such reporting when said about others, as a battle-flag under which to rally one’s troops.

  • Deacon Tony Ferraiuolo
    November 8, 2009 Reply

    Dear Archbishop Dolan, I have been excited about your presence in the Archdiocese of New York from day one, and each occasion that has brought you to the public eye has deepened my excitement and respect for you. Your cordial greeting of the procession of deacons at the ordination of deacons this spring and your willingness to stay until the bitter end to great all those who wanted to meet you when you visited the Orange County vicariate at Sacred Heart Church in Newburgh are only two small occasions where your love and cordiality shined through. Your attempted op-ed, taking a strong stand on a issue that has been relegated to whispers in hallways until now shows what a caring and brave spiritual leader you are. I thank God for you and am proud to be one of your deacons. God bless you.

  • Jim Gallagher/Catholic Action Chair S.I. AOH
    November 8, 2009 Reply

    You have put a revealing spin on “ALL THE NEWS THAT’S FIT TO PRINT”.The NY Times has been getting away with bias and opinionated reporting for years. I think that the present economic conditions that are not very complimentry to the printed medias success, should be the papers reason for fair and unbiased reporting in order to keep their subscribtion base stable. It will be their own dimise if they are not careful.

  • Mary Walsh
    November 8, 2009 Reply

    Cradle Catholic, 14 siblings. Maureen Dowd was right, and spoke only the truth. If you would quit reacting, and LISTEN, you might just save the Church. It’s sexism is beyond tiresome, deeply rooted, and abhorrent. Christ would have listened to her. You are Off Base. We NEED this criticism of the abuses of power of our clergy, all the way to the top. She is PRO Catholic, and your regressive reaction to the truth is deeply saddening. The encouragement of hatred comes right down to the parish level. I see it in my own Parish Council. Appalling.

  • Maryann Macdonald
    November 8, 2009 Reply

    Nice to see the NYT’s Public Editor and Laurie Goodstein both on the defensive, even if the paper is too cowardly to print the archbishop’s remarks.

  • Brian McBride
    November 8, 2009 Reply

    Has the church granted women rights equal to men’s? Did I miss the announcement?

  • Mike Drabik, Toledo, Ohio
    November 8, 2009 Reply

    Dear Archbishop: I read Ms. Goodstein’s response to your charge that the N.Y. Times is guilty of anti-Catholicism. She made some very good points in her letter of the 11/04/09 and I think they merit a public response from you. Her comments on sexual abuse by members for the Catholic clergy are on the mark. In my own diocese of Toledo, the subtle kind of molestation directed at women (and men with same-sex proclivities) is common. I am sure it is the same throughout not only the U.S. but the world. I think it requires and honest look and open and real response. What most victims get though are platitudes; offers of cash settlements and arrogance. The abusers are shielded/protected and sent on leave for a while only to be reassigned to parishes where the whole process can begin again. Archbishop: the Catholic Church has been doing so much good for the world for centuries – even with terrible sinners in her midst. The willingness to be open and transparent can do nothing but help Her to be more Holy which is of course what Jesus ask of Her members living on Earth. Please reflect and pray and take the time to really respond to Ms. Goodstein; be the priest God made you to be forever – be honest and open – it may hurt, but in the long run it will heal all those who have been hurt and you too. I end, respectfully, as just another faithful Roman Catholic brother on the journey with you. May God bless and help you in your ministry.

  • Amy R. Salerno, MD
    November 9, 2009 Reply

    Through the faith and wisdom of Pope John Paul II, and now Pope Benedict XVI, Catholic women are finally being empowered to embrace our God-given attributes of femininity, hospitality, faithfulness etc. As a product of Vatican II, I witnessed the beautiful tradition of the chapel veil erased from my worship. I witnessed the “freeing up” of traditional sisters who often became militant, beligerent and New Age “mini-men” — no real role model for us womenof faith trying to find our way in an increasingly secular society. The likes of Maureen Dowd do not speak for the millions of ‘maternal feminists’ out here that have great devotion to Mother Church, and who are professional, educated, intellectual mothers!! Take a look at the hundreds of Catholic mom blogs on the internet, and one will see that, as women Catholics, we are pleased that Rome is finally calling us ‘home.’ Pax Christi Archbishop Dolan.

  • Martin Hamburger
    November 9, 2009 Reply

    A rare pat on the head is no comfort to the habitually abused. The Times will run the occasional story about the parish which loves its Kenyan curate. Such “generous” coverage cannot negate the distorted lens through which The Times views Catholicism. Foundational to the biases of contemporary media is a world view blurred by moral equivalence. I knew the press was in trouble when I first became aware of the attitude summed up in “Yes, but whose morality?” The Archbishop of New York has an answer to that question. And each human being has the answer implanted by the Holy Spirit in the soul. The campaign against conscience has become a conflagration. We need heroic fire fighters such as Archbishop Dolan.

  • steve dzida
    November 9, 2009 Reply

    Our Church need not fear anything the NY Times might print. Our Church is much more at risk from within! If Archbishop Dolan would REALLY protect our Church he would call on all bishops to join him in a public confession of their sins in covering up the sexual abuse scandal, intimidating victims, exposing children to repeated dangers by permitting predators to stay in active ministry and wasting away billions of dollars for settlements which could have been avoided had the bishops been willing to listen. He would then ask the bishops to join him in displaying a “firm purpose of amendment” by radically reforming the institutional culture and governance that made this tragedy possible. Finally he would ask the People of God for forgiveness and challenge us all to hold him and all our Church leaders accountable not just to each other but to the people they claim to serve.

  • Fran
    November 9, 2009 Reply

    It is neither right nor proper nor just to claim that the church is a victim of the sex abuse scandal. These crimes had real victims, children all. Moreover, the crimes committed by men with ungovernable compulsions were hidden by church officials. Men accused of such crimes or about whom rumors were flying were transferred from parish to parish. The perpetrators consequently did not receive the help they needed (which isn’t short-term rehab) but actually aided and abetted. Needless to say the children did not receive the attention they needed either. The abuse of children of necessity is a matter for the criminal justice system. For obvious reasons it cannot be left to the institution, family, or religious or civic organization. The major consideration of church officials in addressing these issues since it has been neither the well-being of the perpetrators nor of the children appears to be the church’s reputation and coffers. Otherwise, why not support the removal of a statute of limitations? Why would anyone be against a statute of limitations? The investigation of the sisters who do not wear medieval costumes in the United States is a tough sell. There they are day after day feeding the hungry, sheltering the homeless, teaching those who want to learn and even those who don’t, and nursing the sick. For all this, they claim no special privilege. Some are alleged to disagree with official church teaching. “Official” is often interpreted much more broadly than the smaller canon of what is binding, is it not? “Official” can mean anything from support Sarah Palin as it did locally to “attend the Eucharist on Sunday.” Official or not, one is not required to sacrifice their moral judgment or violate their own conscience. If anyone in officialdom is interested in the view from the pew, I have to say we love the sisters and appearing to attack them is what we see as a “foul ball.” The real issue is not what the New York Times did or didn’t say (and it is hard to argue with Clark Hoyt’s dispassionate analysis published on 9/8/09, the issue surely is how can we better live the beatitudes. They are the only game in town. The rest just doesn’t matter.

  • Leon Garcia
    November 9, 2009 Reply

    No es de extrañar que la Iglesia esté como tema de agenda editorial solamente si se trata de conflictos.

  • Martin Hamburger
    November 9, 2009 Reply

    A rare pat on the head is no comfort to the habitually abused. The Times will run the occasional story about the parish which loves its Kenyan curate. Such “generous” coverage cannot negate the distorted lens through which The Times views Catholicism. Foundational to the biases of contemporary media is a world view blurred by moral equivalence. I knew the press was in trouble when I first became aware of the attitude summed up in “Yes, but whose morality?” The Archbishop of New York has an answer to that question. And each human being has the answer implanted by the Holy Spirit in the soul. The campaign against conscience has become a conflagration. We need heroic fire fighters such as Archbishop Dolan.

  • Thomas Cahill
    November 11, 2009 Reply

    Thank you so much Archbishop for not standing by while the Times spews its rampant anti-Catholicism. Your strong defense makes me very proud and gives me courage. Anti-Catholicism really is the one form of bigotry that is completely accepted in today’s day and age. Thank you again. You are a true Shepherd of Christ. Pax tecum.

  • Juan Ignacio Núñez
    November 11, 2009 Reply

    Archibishop Dolan: Congratulations for this demostration of courage and moral integrity. May we have more shepherds in OUR Church who have the courage to defend our Faith and our dignity. Congratulations again, your Excellency, and may all remember that: “The gates of hell shall not prevail against it.” (Matthew 16:18)

  • carlos a. casanova
    November 11, 2009 Reply

    I would like to take the occasion of Goodstein’s response to the Archbishop to vent some truths concerning the liberal academia and the liberal culture in general of the USA. The first thing that needs to be remarked is that Goodstein and other liberals were able to publish their view on the blog of the Archbishops while the Archbishop was unable to publish his view on the NYT. That’s how things are working in general: there is a semblance of freedom of speech but some pressure groups actually control public opinion (not private opinions, but not all of these are able to become public). So, there is censorship and those who exert it accuse the Church of censorship. There is abuse of power and those who abuse it accuse the Church of being “hierarchical” and “dictatorial”. The case of the sexual abuse in the Brooklyn Orthodox Jewish community was reported. The Archbishop did not deny this. What he pointed out is the difference in the way in which this case was reported and the way in which the Catholic cases were. Goodstein justifies the difference with this argument: “But the abuse story has been bigger for the Catholic Church simply because of the quantitative facts: there are more priests accused, more alleged victims, more countries involved [Note by Carlos Casanova: the Spanish clergy and the Mexican clergy were slandered by well known movies which came to light in the wake of the scandal in the USA, movies that have no basis in reality], more settlements, more years since the problem first became public, more legal and financial consequences and simply more people affected.” There are several problems with this reply: the story not only has been “bigger” but the press has tried to make the public believe that it is more than a tiny minority of the priest who have incurred in this crime. If you have a big population it is natural that you have greater numbers, but that does not imply greater proportion (children abusers/children care-givers) or greater gravity of the cases. However, I do not wish to enter into this aspect of the discussion. Instead, I want to point out that the NYT are trying to portray religious people of any kind (“The Times has written about the sexual abuse of minors by clergy of many faiths: Jews, Southern Baptists, mainline Protestants, Jehovah’s Witnesses, Orthodox Christians, evangelicals”, Goodstein dixit) as the main child abusers of the world, but still most of all Catholic clergy. This is a trend existing in all the liberal or “Enlightened” media, which is to say in most of the media. Here I find the main bias of the media: it is anti-religious in general, and anti-Catholic in particular. One can think, for example, how Dr. Kinsey has been portrayed by Hollywood as a hero, when a mere reading of his report shows that he was involved in sexual abuse of children. One can think how Judith Reisman findings on the matter were hidden from public opinion and remain almost unknown. One can think equally, how much Dr. Freud is promoted by liberals, a man for whom incest is the most basic human drive. Nobody seems to go to the roots of what is happening among different religious groups: the rottenness of the liberal culture is infiltrating those communities which are the only ones trying to resist such rottenness. The sexual liberation among the clergy in the 60s as well as the advice of Freudian psychologists at the Seminaries have a lot to do with the problems reported by the liberal media, which use the fruits of the corruption caused by the very culture which animates them to further attack their enemies. The greatest hypocrisy ever seen in history is the hypocrisy of the liberal culture (a) which promotes and propagates the sexual liberation in the style of Wilhelm Reich, Herbert Marcuse, Planned Parenthood, and Brave New World, and later cries “corruption!,” when a religious person or group falls victim of the very propaganda of such “liberation”; (b) which claps or is silent in the face of the Dutch associations of pedophiliacs, (c) which does not support the drawing of legal consequences of the greatest findings against the rings of child pornography (done recently by an Italian priest), for example. I am not impressed when Goodstein tells that she is receiving a prize from liberal academia. In liberal academia (which is most of the USA academia, with the exception of a minority of denominational colleges and universities, and includes many pseudo-denominational ones), and especially in religious studies the love for truth and the respect of the sources is disappearing in the USA. When a “scholar” can interpret St. Francis’ love for poverty as a “neurosis” triggered by money and then get rewarded for writing such non-sense with honors from prestigious universities one knows that academia is no longer the place to search for wisdom. In order to find wisdom, we need to look precisely in those groups that are persecuted in a veiled way by the NYT and the rest of the liberal media.

  • Dawn
    November 11, 2009 Reply

    I have read this article. I have read the blog statements. I am dismayed. The truth is that sometimes the Church — whether Catholic or Protestant, or some other denomination, is a triage unit for sinners, and nothing less. That means our importance must lie in following TRUTH, not worries about scandal, or the defense of it. When a priest messes up it is always the same, and everyone gets looked down upon. It just so happens it has been with the Church I defend daily by my actions, right now. Whether the mess up is with a minor or an adult in regards to employment — whether priest, nun, or a lay person it doesn’t matter. There is a need for accountability: whether they are accusers first — to deflect blame and tell lies for self-protection, — or just runners from consequences. The fact is that no single human being is perfect. We all have to be held accountable for our actions at some point in our lives. That means the men and women who are better at leading the flock need commendation, and the men and women who should find other work should find other work. Either way we need to be thankful of those who lead well, and thankful as well for the media when they ask for accountability, if it can be done without making sweeping judgments about the whole group, under attack. Thanks for the article, and Thanks Bishop Dolan, for working so hard!

  • JV
    November 11, 2009 Reply

    A smart, intelligent woman who is unafraid of speaking truth to power, gives me much hope. When I read Ms. Dowd’s articles, I know I am witnessing the elegant mind of an Irish-American woman in full force. Brava, Maureen Dowd! I believe in the teachings of Jesus, but I do not believe in the institution of the Church. The Church is an institution bent on maintaining it’s wealth and power, something so far from teachings of Jesus Christ.

  • Stefano Novati
    November 12, 2009 Reply

    Un caloroso abbraccio dall’Italia, Sua Eminenza. Congratulazioni per l’articolo, per crucem ad lucem! un abbraccio fraterno, Stefano Novati

  • EAMarchak
    November 13, 2009 Reply

    I would think the Catholic Church would be deeply embarrassed by this FOUL BALL! blog posting. It is a self-absorbed, poorly constructed diatribe that shows how irrelevant and out-of-touch the archbishop is. Anti-Catholic sentiment? Tell that to the Muslim community. Tell that to those of Jewish faith who lost millions of their own during WWII which, by the way, the Catholic Church chose to largely ignore. Children in public schools are abused too. Does that make it OK? The public schools are not the home of God, which is supposed to be a safe haven. The outrage, which the archbishop doesn’t seem to understand, it that the Catholic Church chose to cover up and/or ignore thousands of instances of abuse across generations. And it spirited Boston’s Cardinal Law to Rome for safekeeping. MoDo can and should criticize the Catholic Church and her colleagues can and should write stories about the church’s failings because their job is to inform, not take sides, educate, not patronize. Remember, the Catholic Church doesn’t believe it is accountable to its flock, so it would rather not have its transgressions on page 1. There is, however, lots of merit in all the stories but let me focus on the story about the Franciscan priest: Under current laws, the son probably won’t be able to get insurance if/when the church’s coverage ceases because he has a preexisting condition – cancer. And the Catholic Church opposes health care reform for millions of people, thousands of whom could die without medical coverage because a handful might want an abortion.

  • P.J.
    November 13, 2009 Reply

    His Excellency, Archbishop Timothy M. Dolan: The following seriously warrants your immediate attention: On Sunday evening 10/25/09 a popular sitcom(CURB YOUR ENTHUSIASM)on cable channel HBO aired a segment in which the Jewish lead character/writer/producer urinates on a picture of Jesus Christ hanging on the wall of a bathroom in a Catholic home. If this had been done to a picture of the Grand Rebbe Menachem Mendel Schneerson, a Mezuzah, Menorah, Yarmulke, Star of David, or a picture of Mecca, Muhammad, the results would be catastrophic….the Jews would yell anti-Semite and the Muslims would order a fatwah and kill the offender. Yet the Catholic Church and the Christians sit back and tolerate it. Please do something about this! Thank you.

  • Peggy Warren
    November 13, 2009 Reply

    Laurie Goodstein’s article regarding the priest and the adult woman is relevant, not only because the son is dying of cancer but because presently more and more women are finding their voice and speaking out against sexual exploitation by clergy. Clergy exploiting adults is a CRIME in several states and several more states have bills on their legislative agendas making this behavior a crime. A ‘man of God’, like a Catholic priest, that is supposed to be a Catholic’s guide to salvation, crossing the boundaries and having sexual relations with a parishioner is devastating beyond words. More often than not the parishioner is a married woman, leaving not only her faith and life in shambles but her spouse and children’s lives. Slowly but surely more and more diocese are realizing the trauma that this type of exploitation creates and are ridding themselves of these predatory priests.

  • Robert Wiggers
    November 14, 2009 Reply

    So the New Times is anti-Catholic because it wants “release of names of abusers, rollback of statute of limitations, external investigations, release of all records, and total transparency”? But the people most active in seeking those actions are, like Maureen Dowd, themselves Catholic! And, as a Catholic myself, I see nothing anti-Catholic about it. As terrible as the breach of trust by the priests has been, what I find truly horrifying was what appears to be an almost universal cover-up and sometimes even enabling by many members of the hierarchy. The fact that much of the publicity is being channeled through secular media like the Times should come as no surprise. The Catholic Church and the hierarchy are seen as a powerful and secretive organization in our national life, not an other-worldly entity, and the public is obviously interested in it. Any response to that interest should be on the merits, not ad hominem attacks on the publishers as “anti-Catholic.”

  • Father Francis Colamaria
    November 15, 2009 Reply

    Deo Gratias! Your excellency, Thanks! You are not only filling the shoes of the fisherman with joy you are filling the shoes of another New Yorker whom we loved so well…. Cardinal O’Connor. Keep smiling. And keep preaching the truth!

  • david j. ritchie
    November 15, 2009 Reply

    Here is an e-mail I just sent to the Public Editor of the NY Times on his “acquittal” of the NY Times on charges of anti-Catholicism:

    Dear Public Editor,

    As to your acquittal of the NY Times of charges of Anti-Catholicism: “I don’t buy it” (to use your phrase in the 11/7 NY Times). Archbishop Dolan has not been around for long in NYC, but he has already picked up on the NY Times’s anti-Catholicism. I have seen it for 40 years or so.

    The coverage of Catholicism was relatively okay in the Early Sixties, but as the Sixties turned into the Seventies, the NY Times’s anti-Catholicism got more marked.

    One of the baldest examples of its anti-Catholicism was the NY Times’s editorial when a third Catholic nominee was named to the Supreme Court within the past decade or two. Catholics represent 25% of Americans, and if inactive Catholics are included, more like 35%. Yet, the very NY Times that is in favor of remedying past discrimination with corrective appointments objected because a mere third of the USSC would be Catholic. Similar articles and concerns about Catholicism are now routine at the NY Times when a new Catholic rises to the USSC, at least if their political background is not where the NY Times wants it to be.

    And it is an “anti-Catholic thing.” I did not see any similar concern with “over-representation” when the Jewish Stephen Breyer joined the Jewish Ruth Bader Ginsburg on the USSC to give the Jewish community a “representation” of 2/9. Clearly, Mr. Justice Breyer’s appointment resulted in Jews (perhaps 2% of the US population) being far more heavily “represented” (22.22% for 2%) than was the case with the third Catholic (33.33% for 25-35%) or even with a sixth Catholic (66.67% for 25-35%)! What is it about Catholics that drives the NY Times to outright discrimination against them in particular?

    David J. Ritchie

  • S. C. Eklund
    November 16, 2009 Reply

    As I am about to leave for work, I haven’t time to cite the sort of examples Archbishop Dolan pinpoints in his denied Op-Ed piece. Suffice it to say, that although my work requires me to examine “The New York Times” on a daily basis, I am now extremely careful to keep that examination as succinct as possible, clicking on as few tabs as possible, seeking most of my news and all of my editorials elsewhere. It has been clear for at least the past decade that the “Times” is on a crusade against Catholicism in general and the Catholic hierarchy in particular. It is stupifying that this newspaper could feign surprise at being – at last – called on it by New York’s courageous new archbishop. I haven’t been successful in persuading two of my family members to drop your print edition, but, with God’s grace they’ll get the message this time.

    Praise the Lord and pass “The Wall Street Journal!”

  • S. C. Eklund
    November 16, 2009 Reply

    The above is a comment I was unsuccessful in being able to email to the public editor at the NYTimes…figures.

  • C.F.
    November 16, 2009 Reply

    As further proof of the inclinations of the Times, this independent report compares the lengths the Times went to not to criticize radical Islam after the incident at Fort Hood, with the way the Times reported on persecution of Mormons after Proposition 8 in California.

  • mvd
    November 19, 2009 Reply

    J. Waldmann, That was so well-said, especially the last line.

  • Gene B NJ
    November 19, 2009 Reply

    Another “cheap shot” by the NY Times against the Catholic Church was the book review of Oct. 25, 2009, where the reviewer blandly states that the Catholic Church “…for a time in the 1940s, sponsored public burnings of comics at parochial schools… .” [page 17 of Book Review]. Would the Times editors allow such drivel if similar generalized allegations were made against other organized religions?

  • Firmin DeBrabander
    November 20, 2009 Reply

    The Catholic Church has bigger fish to fry than taking on the New York Times- Look into your own house! Has our church dealt with this mortifying and horrifying pedophilia case fairly? Absolutely not! As a practice and mortified Catholic, the New York Times cannot call this scandal to our attention ENOUGH! It MUST NOT HAPPEN AGAIN! And if it does, we must deal with it honorably, not in cowardly and authoritative fashion like Cardinal Law. Don’t throw stones at the NY TImes- get your own house in order Archbishop. And as for Maureen Dowd- I concur with Mr. McBride above: indeed, has the Catholic Church ensured and announced complete equality of men and women? Give me a break- M. Dowd said nothing contrary, and everybody knows it.
    I concur with other comments above: the Church must listen to its critics in and outside the church- Ms. Dowd’s criticisms are coming from plenty of Catholics. Listen to the people- This pedophilia crisis is prime example of NOT listening, and acting authoritatively, going it on your own. Obviously, not a good idea. Please make me proud to be a Catholic again- the behavior of the Church, and then its off the mark reactions, make that very hard at times!!!

  • Chiara G.
    November 22, 2009 Reply

    On October 27th, I cancelled my 20 year daily subscription to the NYTimes after reading the NY Times blog by Randy Cohen “Can We Talk About Religion Please?”. It was the last straw following Laurie Goodstein’s front page article about the Franciscan priest who had fathered a child, her article with Rachel Donadio about the Pope’s announcement about the Anglicans reception into the Catholic Church, and Maureen Dowd’s screed against all things Catholic. When the customer service representative asked me why I was cancelling my NY Times subscription, I explained that I would no longer pay to have such anti-Catholicism in my home.

    God bless Archbishop Dolan for the courage to stand up to the NY Times.

  • Gene Giordano
    November 25, 2009 Reply

    Welcome to New York Archbishop! The land of loud fans and loud critics! Keep up the good work, you have the strength and personality to fit right in, but most importantly the faith for such an important role.

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    December 8, 2009 Reply

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  • Osvaldo Vallone
    January 3, 2010 Reply

    Congratulations Your Excellency on your bravery and clarity! From Buenos Aires, Argentina, here’s my support to you. Our Lord Jesus and His Most Blessed Mother guard you in these difficult times.

  • Christina
    March 31, 2010 Reply

    Thank you so much for defending the church against the Times. Have a blessed Triduum and know that I am praying for you.

  • Annina from Italy
    March 31, 2010 Reply

    BRAVO!

  • David
    March 31, 2010 Reply

    Your Grace,

    GOD BLESS YOU for coming to the aid of Our Dear Holy Father! This Holy Father as Pope John Paul II, is a great inspiration to all the Catholic/Christian Faithful! The NY Times and the secular media are driven by Satan, we all know that, and ther is a hidden Agenda.
    Funny no one says a word about the Filth on TV and what the news media promotes.

    May GOD BLESS YOU and OUR LADY keep YOU Her Care.

    Bouno Pasqua!

    Davido

  • tłumaczenia techniczne
    March 1, 2011 Reply

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  • Koty Rasowe
    March 8, 2011 Reply

    Such a nice blog, and so little comments ;).

  • Attorney
    March 19, 2011 Reply

    It is refreshing to read how you closed out the post. specifically, “The Catholic Church is not above criticism. We Catholics do a fair amount of it ourselves. We welcome and expect it. All we ask is that such critique be fair, rational, and accurate, what we would expect for anybody.”

    Open, fair, respectable disagreement and the discussion that arises from it is so refreshing, and will lead to a better world.

  • RickyH
    August 29, 2011 Reply

    As someone who went to Catholic school for 12 years, was an altar boy, and considered joining the priesthood, I have to say it saddens me to see the bad reputation the church has in many ways today. I hope it is fixable. I pray it is.

  • RonaldatTib
    December 30, 2016 Reply

    Exactly as you say.

 

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